Healthy Eating — A Detailed Guide for Beginners

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The foods you eat have big effects on your health and quality of life.

Although eating healthy can be fairly simple, the rise in popular “diets” and dieting trends has caused confusion.

In fact, these trends often distract from the basic nutrition principles that are most important.

This is a detailed beginner’s guide to healthy eating, based on the latest in nutrition science.

Why Should You Eat Healthy?

Research continues to link serious diseases to a poor diet (1, 2).

For example, eating healthy can drastically reduce your chances of developing heart disease and cancer, the world’s leading killers (3, 4, 5).

A good diet can improve all aspects of life, from brain function to physical performance. In fact, food affects all your cells and organs (6, 7, 8, 9).

If you participate in exercise or sports, there is no doubt that a healthy diet will help you perform better (10).

Bottom Line:

From disease risk to brain function and physical performance, a healthy diet is vital for every aspect of life.

Calories and Energy Balance Explained

In recent years, the importance of calories has been pushed aside.

While calorie counting isn’t always necessary, total calorie intake still plays a key role in weight control and health (11, 12).

If you put in more calories than you burn, you will store them as new muscle or body fat. If you consume fewer calories than you burn every day, you will lose weight.

If you want to lose weight, you must create some form of calorie deficit (13).

In contrast, if you are trying to gain weight and increase muscle mass, then you need to eat more than your body burns.

Bottom Line:

Calories and energy balance are important, regardless of the composition of your diet.

Understanding Macronutrients

The three macronutrients are carbohydrates (carbs), fats and protein.

These nutrients are needed in relatively large amounts. They provide calories and have various functions in your body.

Here are some common foods within each macronutrient group:

  • Carbs: 4 calories per gram. All starchy foods like bread, pasta and potatoes. Also includes fruit, legumes, juice, sugar and some dairy products.
  • Protein: 4 calories per gram. Main sources include meat and fish, dairy, eggs, legumes and vegetarian alternatives like tofu.
  • Fats: 9 calories per gram. Main sources include nuts, seeds, oils, butter, cheese, oily fish and fatty meat.

How much of each macronutrient you should consume depends on your lifestyle and goals, as well as your personal preferences.

Bottom Line:

Macronutrients are the three main nutrients needed in large amounts: carbs, fats and protein.

Understanding Micronutrients

Micronutrients are important vitamins and minerals that you require in smaller doses.

Some of the most common micronutrients you should know include:

  • Magnesium: Plays a role in over 600 cellular processes, including energy production, nervous system function and muscle contraction (14).
  • Potassium: This mineral is important for blood pressure control, fluid balance and the function of your muscles and nerves (15).
  • Iron: Primarily known for carrying oxygen in the blood, iron also has many other benefits, including improved immune and brain function (16).
  • Calcium: An important structural component of bones and teeth, and also a key mineral for your heart, muscles and nervous system (17, 18).
  • All vitamins: The vitamins, from vitamin A to K, play important roles in every organ and cell in your body.

All of the vitamins and minerals are “essential” nutrients, meaning that you must get them from the diet in order to survive.

The daily requirement of each micronutrient varies between individuals. If you eat a real food-based diet that includes plants and animals, then you should get all the micronutrients your body needs without taking a supplement.

Bottom Line:

Micronutrients are important vitamins and minerals that play key roles in your cells and organs.

Eating Whole Foods is Important

You should aim to consume whole foods at least 80-90% of the time.

The term “whole foods” generally describes natural, unprocessed foods containing only one ingredient.

If the product looks like it was made in a factory, then it’s probably not a whole food.

Whole foods tend to be nutrient-dense and have a lower energy density. This means that they have fewer calories and more nutrients per serving than processed foods.

In contrast, many processed foods have little nutritional value and are often referred to as “empty” calories. Eating them in large amounts is linked to obesity and other diseases.

Bottom Line:

Basing your diet on whole foods is an extremely effective but simple strategy to improve health and lose weight.

Try to base your diet around these healthy food groups:

  • Vegetables: These should play a fundamental role at most meals. They are low in calories yet full of important micronutrients and fiber.
  • Fruits: A natural sweet treat, fruit provides micronutrients and antioxidants that can help improve health (19).
  • Meat and fish: Meat and fish have been the major sources of protein throughout evolution. They are a staple in the human diet, although vegetarian and vegan diets have become popular as well.
  • Nuts and seeds: These are one of the best fat sources available and also contain important micronutrients.
  • Eggs: Considered one of the healthiest foods on the planet, whole eggs pack a powerful combination of protein, beneficial fats and micronutrients (20).
  • Dairy: Dairy products such as natural yogurt and milk are convenient, low-cost sources of protein and calcium.
  • Healthy starches: For those who aren’t on a low-carb diet, whole food starchy foods like potatoes, quinoa and Ezekiel bread are healthy and nutritious.
  • Beans and legumes: These are fantastic sources of fiber, protein and micronutrients.
  • Beverages: Water should make up the majority of your fluid intake, along with drinks like coffee and tea.
  • Herbs and spices: These are often very high in nutrients and beneficial plant compounds.

For a longer list, here is an article with 50 super healthy foods.

Bottom Line:

Base your diet on these healthy whole foods and ingredients. They will provide all the nutrients your body needs.

Foods to Avoid Most of the Time

By following the advice in this article, you will naturally reduce your intake of unhealthy foods.

No food needs to be eliminated forever, but some foods should be limited or saved for special occasions.

These include:

  • Sugar-based products: Foods high in sugar, especially sugary drinks, are linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes (21, 22, 23).
  • Trans fats: Also known as partially hydrogenated fats, trans fats have been linked to serious diseases, such as heart disease (24, 25).
  • Refined carbs: Foods that are high in refined carbs, such as white bread, are linked to overeating, obesity and metabolic disease (26, 27, 28).
  • Vegetable oils: While many people believe these are healthy, vegetable oils can disrupt your body’s omega 6-to-3 balance, which may cause problems (29, 30).
  • Processed low-fat products: Often disguised as healthy alternatives, low-fat products usually contain a lot of sugar to make them taste better.

Bottom Line:

While no food is strictly off limits, overeating certain foods can increase disease risk and lead to weight gain.

Why Portion Control is Important

Your calorie intake is a key factor in weight control and health.

By controlling your portions, you are more likely to avoid consuming too many calories.

While whole foods are certainly a lot harder to overeat than processed foods, they can still be eaten in excess.

If you are overweight or trying to lose body fat, it’s particularly important to monitor your portion size.

There are many simple strategies to control portion size.

For example, you can use smaller plates and take a smaller-than-average first serving, then wait 20 minutes before you return for more.

Another popular approach is measuring portion size with your hand. An example meal would limit most people to 1 fist-sized portion of carbs, 1–2 palms of protein and 1–2 thumb-sized portions of healthy fats.

More calorie-dense foods such as cheese, nuts and fatty meats are healthy, but make sure you pay attention to portion sizes when you eat them.

Bottom Line:

Be aware of portion sizes and your total food or calorie intake, especially if you are overweight or trying to lose fat.

How to Tailor Your Diet to Your Goals

First, assess your calorie needs based on factors like your activity levels and weight goals.

Quite simply, if you want to lose weight, you must eat less than you burn. If you want to gain weight, you should consume more calories than you burn.

Here is a calorie calculator that tells you how much you should eat, and here are 5 free websites and apps that help you track calories and nutrients.

If you dislike calorie counting, you can simply apply the rules discussed above, such as monitoring portion size and focusing on whole foods.

If you have a certain deficiency or are at risk of developing one, you may wish to tailor your diet to account for this. For instance, vegetarians or people who eliminate certain food groups are at greater risk of missing out on some nutrients.

In general, you should consume foods of various types and colors to ensure you get plenty of all the macro- and micronutrients.

While many debate whether low-carb or low-fat diets are best, the truth is that it depends on the individual.

Based on research, athletes and those looking to lose weight should consider increasing their protein intake. In addition, a lower-carb diet may work wonders for some individuals trying to lose weight or treat type 2 diabetes (31, 32).

Bottom Line:

Consider your total calorie intake and adjust your diet based on your own needs and goals.

How to Make Healthy Eating Sustainable

Here’s a great rule to live by: If you can’t see yourself on this diet in one, two or three years, then it’s not right for you.

Far too often, people go on extreme diets they can’t maintain, which means they never actually develop long-term, healthy eating habits.

There are some frightening weight gain statistics showing that most people regain all the weight they lost soon after attempting a weight loss diet (33).

As always, balance is key. Unless you have a specific disease or dietary requirement, no food needs to be off limits forever. By totally eliminating certain foods, you may actually increase cravings and decrease long-term success.

Basing 90% of your diet on whole foods and eating smaller portions will allow you to enjoy treats occasionally yet still achieve excellent health.

This is a far healthier approach than doing the opposite and eating 90% processed food and only 10% whole food like many people do.

Bottom Line:

Create a healthy diet that you can enjoy and stick with for the long term. If you want unhealthy foods, save them for an occasional treat.

Consider These Supplements

As the name suggests, supplements are meant to be used in addition to a healthy diet.

Including plenty of nutrient-dense foods in your diet should help you reverse deficiencies and meet all your daily needs.

However, a few well-researched supplements have been shown to be helpful in some cases.

One example is vitamin D, which is naturally obtained from sunlight and foods like oily fish. Most people have low levels or are deficient (34).

Supplements like magnesium, zinc and omega-3s can provide additional benefits if you do not get enough of them from your diet (14, 35, 36).

Other supplements can be used to enhance sports performance. Creatine, whey protein and beta-alanine all have plenty of research supporting their use (37, 38, 39).

In a perfect world, your diet would be full of nutrient-dense foods with no need for supplements. However, this isn’t always achievable in the real world.

If you are already making a constant effort to improve your diet, additional supplements can help take your health a step further.

Bottom Line:

It is best to get most of your nutrients from whole foods. However, some supplements can be useful as well.

Combine Good Nutrition With Other Healthy Habits

Nutrition isn’t the only thing that matters for optimal health.

Following a healthy diet and exercising can give you an even bigger health boost.

It is also crucial to get good sleep. Research shows that sleep is just as important as nutrition for disease risk and weight control (40, 41).

Hydration and water intake are also important. Drink when you’re thirsty and stay well hydrated all day.

Finally, try to minimize stress. Long-term stress is linked to many health problems.

Bottom Line:

Optimal health goes way beyond just nutrition. Exercising, getting good sleep and minimizing stress is also crucial.

The strategies outlined above will drastically improve your diet.

They will also boost your health, lower your disease risk and help you lose weight.

Best Minimalist Living Blogs of 2020

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The minimalist lifestyle isn’t just about a simple design aesthetic. It’s a much broader concept, a philosophy that embraces living with less — fewer physical possessions, less debt and unnecessary expense, and a more intentional promotion of the intangible things you value most.

There can be a lot of benefits to minimalist living. In selecting this year’s best minimalist living blogs, we looked for people who are sharing their journey and experiences. We hope you find them as educating, inspiring, and empowering as we did.

Some have begun addressing the emotional and practical impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on a minimalist lifestyle. Many say minimalist living frees up time and energy to meet the challenges of living under lockdown, but the emotional longing for family, friends, and the return of normalcy still seeps through.

Unfancy

Caroline launched her blog in an effort to find her own style and curb her self-described “mindless shopping habit.” She committed to a 1-year experiment with a capsule wardrobe — a small, structured collection of 37 pieces. At the end of it, she found she was more content, more confident, and more in tune with her personal style than ever before. Now, she’s sharing outfit ideas, closet-curating tips, packing guides, and her own brand of the “less is more” philosophy.

Save. Spend. Splurge.

Financial simplicity is the idea on this blog, which is maintained by a practical minimalist who only spends on and keeps what she loves. Sherry shows her visitors exactly how to spend money without feeling guilty, live with less without feeling deprived, and save for their future while still splurging on what they love.

Be More with Less

Learn how to be more with less by simplifying your life so you can create time and space to discover what really matters. Courtney Carver is the inspiring voice behind this blog, and she’s teaching people how to do exactly that. She traded in an overwhelming, uninspired life in which she worked too much, spent too much, and slept too little, and now she’s sharing the big and small changes that lead to a life lived with purpose.

Slow Your Home

After decluttering her own home and life, and rediscovering her health, passion, and energy along the way, Brooke is on a mission to help others who want to do the same thing. On her blog and podcast, she’s sharing the concept of slow living and the beautiful benefits of living with less.

No Sidebar

Clearing out the “stuff” in our lives, our homes, our minds, and on our calendars is the first step in crafting the life you really want. No Sidebar can help you understand what’s getting in your way. Browse their articles for specific advice, or move toward a simpler life with their 30-day email course designed to inspire and encourage you along the way.

SMART Living 365

Kathy Gottberg is a six-time author who uses her blog as a platform to explore ideas and experiences that help create a meaningful, sustainable, compassionate, and rewarding life. Her posts are varied and sharp, offering inspiration and a unique perspective.

Reading My Tea Leaves

A lifestyle blog written by Erin Boyle, Reading My Tea Leaves celebrates a practical, purposeful approach to a simple and sustainable life. That means DIY tutorials for making your own night-lights or kraft paper roll holders, posts about living life in a tiny apartment, waste-not recipes, eco-friendly family travel advice, and tips for living simply but beautifully.

Exile Lifestyle

Colin Wright’s blog is an interesting portrayal of one man’s decision to scale down his entire life. In 2009, Colin had enjoyed professional success but realized his lifestyle didn’t align with what he actually wanted in life. So he got rid of everything he couldn’t fit into a carry-on bag and started traveling the globe. Today, the author and speaker continues to publish introspective posts about his experiences and perspective on life, travel, and what it means to live simply.

Mr. Money Mustache

Mr. Money Mustache is a witty, useful resource for finding financial freedom by spending less than you earn. In 2011, out of pure exasperation, the retired-at-30 Mr. Money Mustache launched his blog to share some of the secrets to creating a life better than your current one — at half the price. His posts are comprehensive and detailed, with enough information to get you started on the road to early retirement.

Going Zero Waste

Kathryn is on a mission to save the planet, and she’s doing it through a zero-waste lifestyle. Her blog is helping others do the same, with tried-and-true recipes that break down the zero-waste concept into an easy step-by-step process. This is also a great place to find a like-minded community and support in such a challenging goal.

Nourishing Minimalism

If clearing the clutter in your home is a goal that always feels out of reach, Nourishing Minimalism can help. Rachel Jones was embarrassed by the messy state of her home, and minimalism proved to be a tool that helped her focus on what’s important. Now, she’s sharing the methods of simplifying that make it easy to maintain a joyful, peaceful home.

Break the Twitch

If you find yourself checking your phone far too often or buying something unnecessary whenever you feel down, this blog is for you. Anthony Ongaro says we do these things just to distract ourselves from discomfort. His blog is full of tools to break unproductive habits. He calls this “breaking the twitch.” On the blog, he offers videos, podcasts, tips, and a monthly newsletter to help you stop automatic behaviors and free up time for what matters most in your life.

Simply + Fiercely

This is a step-by-step guide that takes you from clutter to intentional living. Blogger Jennifer Burger is a self-described shopaholic turned minimalist. After she minimized and decluttered her environment, her life fell into place, too. Now she offers her methods in blog posts, podcasts, and how-to courses like “The One-Day Closet Cleanse” and “Clear Your Clutter.” She invites you to join her on a journey to simple and intentional living.

Karen Sincerely

Karen Liszewski is a life coach who offers information, tips, and inspiration for living a minimalist life. Her blog helps you get started with meditation, slowing down, and decluttering. Karen began her own journey by scaling down her apartment and her mind to relieve her skyrocketing anxiety. She now uses her blog and one-on-one virtual life coaching to guide others from the overwhelm, fear, and mental paralysis that often characterize the start of a minimalist lifestyle to the freedom and slower pace you find once you’ve taken the first few steps.

Ditching Suburbia

This blog shows you how to exchange a complicated modern life for a simpler way of living. You’ll read stories of a little-known group of post-suburban nomads who traded their mortgages and houses full of things for a portable lifestyle on a boat, RV, or van. Blog writers Matt and Tabitha Best felt stifled in the suburbs, so they and their seven children took to the road in an RV. They offer information, personal experience, podcasts, and a weekly newsletter to teach others how to live a simpler life with more time for family activities, children’s education, and adventure.

The Diary of a Frugal Family

If you’re looking for ways to economize the expenses of family life, this is the blog for you. Since Cass started the blog 6 years ago, it has accumulated lots of tips and resources, like a downloadable budget planner, meal ideas and recipes, instructions for homemade cleaning supplies, and 50 ways to save money. Cass also focuses on family activities like making a family poster together or a bird feeder in a mug. If you’re ready to save money and have family fun at the same time, this is the blog for you.

Black Minimalists

Yolanda Acree launched this blog in 2015 after finding few Black minimalist platforms. She found that Blacks experience minimalism differently from the mainstream and wanted to give voice to those differences. Black lifestyle is bound to Black culture, she writes, and both are interconnected with Black liberation. She wants to give support to a community who understands this connection and experiences the benefits of minimalism in their daily lives. You’ll find many posts about the Black minimalist movement here, but also informative writing about everyday living, such as eating well, summer beauty tips, and travel.

Clothed in Abundance

Deborah Shepherd identifies as a plus-sized fashion model who describes herself as “The Broke Minimalist.” She focuses on minimalist fashion, mental health, and money tips. You’ll find broad-based posts on her blog like, “How To Improve Your Finances, Relationships, and Mindset With Minimalism,” as well as practical focused advice like “4 Ways to Earn Extra Money When You’re Broke.” She offers her help in showing how to remove the clutter that sits between you and your life goals. This includes not just tangible clutter, but mental and financial obstacles as well.

Zen Habits

Leo Babauta writes a blog about clearing clutter from your life to make room for the important things. His content focuses on changing habits in your life, one at a time. This regular guy has welcomed a lot of changes into his own life in the last 15 years, such as quitting smoking, becoming a runner, waking earlier, becoming a vegan, and tripling his income. He offers informative posts about how you can accomplish the same level of change in your own life. He also gives the Zen perspective on current cultural issues, such as, “The Not Knowing of This Moment of Confronting Racism.”

If you have a favorite blog you’d like to nominate, please email us at [email protected]

7 Circulatory System Diseases: Symptoms, Risks, and More

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Overview

The circulatory system is your heart and blood vessels, and it’s essential to keeping your body functioning. This finely tuned system carries oxygen, nutrients, electrolytes, and hormones throughout your body. Interruptions, blockage, or diseases that affect how your heart or blood vessels pump blood can cause complications such as heart disease or stroke.

These complications can arise due to a variety of factors, from genetics to lifestyle. Read on to learn more about the types circulatory system diseases and disorders and what their symptoms are.

Blood pressure is the measurement of how much force is used to pump blood through your arteries. If you have high blood pressure, also called hypertension, it means the force is higher than it should be. High blood pressure can damage your heart and lead to heart disease, stroke, or kidney disease.

There are no symptoms with high blood pressure, which is why it’s often called “the silent killer.” For more information, read about hypertension.

Atherosclerosis, also known as hardening of the arteries, occurs when plaque builds up on the walls of your arteries and eventually blocks blood flow. Plaque is made of cholesterol, fat, and calcium.

Coronary artery disease indicates that the plaque buildup in your arteries has caused the arteries to narrow and harden. Blood clots can further block the arteries.

Coronary artery disease develops over time. You can have it but not be aware of any symptoms. Other times, it may cause chest pain or the sensation of heaviness in the chest.

A heart attack occurs when not enough blood reaches your heart. This can happen due to artery blockage. Heart attacks damage the heart muscle and are medical emergencies.

Call 911 or have someone else call if you have symptoms such as:

  • pain in the center or left side of the chest that feels like mild or severe discomfort, pressure, fullness, or squeezing
  • pain that radiates from the jaw, shoulder, arm, or across the back
  • shortness of breath
  • sweating
  • nausea
  • irregular heartbeat
  • unconsciousness

Women often experience heart attacks a little differently, with pressure or aching in their back and chest.

Learn more: Heart attack symptoms in men and women »

Sometimes called congestive heart failure, heart failure occurs when the heart muscle is weakened or damaged. It can no longer pump the volume of blood needed through the body. Heart failure normally occurs when you’ve had other heart problems, such as a heart attack or coronary artery disease.

Early symptoms of heart failure include fatigue, swelling in your ankles, and increased need to urinate at night. More severe symptoms include rapid breathing, chest pain, and fainting. For more on heart failure and how to recognize it, read about congestive heart failure.

Strokes often occur when a blood clot blocks an artery in the brain and reduces the blood supply. They also can happen when a blood vessel in the brain breaks open. Both events keep blood and oxygen from reaching the brain. As a result, parts of the brain are likely to be damaged.

A stroke requires immediate medical attention. You can identify a stroke with a FAST test:

Read more: Everything you need to know about stroke symptoms »

An abdominal aortic aneurism is a bulge in a weakened part of the aorta. The aorta is the largest blood vessel in your body. It carries blood from your heart to your abdomen, legs, and pelvis. If the aorta ruptures, it can cause heavy bleeding that’s life-threatening.

An abdominal aortic aneurism can stay small and never cause problems, in which case your doctor may take a “wait and watch” approach. When it becomes larger, you may experience pain in the abdomen or back. Large and rapidly growing abdominal aortic aneurisms are at greatest risk of rupturing. These require immediate attention.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is atherosclerosis that occurs in the extremities, usually in your legs. It reduces blood flow to your legs, as well as to your heart and brain. If you have PAD, you’re at greater risk of developing other circulatory system diseases.

Many people have no symptoms with PAD. But if you do, symptoms may include:

  • pain or cramping in the legs, especially when walking
  • coolness in legs or feet
  • sores that don’t heal on the feet or legs
  • redness or other changes in skin color

Certain factors can increase your risk for circulatory system diseases.

Modifiable risk factors

Modifiable risk factors are factors that can be controlled, changed, or treated with lifestyle changes. These risk factors include:

  • lack of exercise
  • being overweight
  • smoking
  • overuse of alcohol
  • high levels of stress
  • poor diet

Managing certain conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes can also affect your risk.

Nonmodifiable risk factors

Risk factors that can’t be controlled, treated, or modified include:

  • advanced age
  • maleness
  • family history of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol
  • certain ethnicities

Men have a greater risk than premenopausal women for stroke. Also, some ethnicities have a higher risk for certain diseases than others.

Talk to a doctor if you think you’re at risk of a circulatory system disease. They can help develop a treatment or management plan for your condition.

Heart attacks, strokes, and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurisms are life-threatening. When someone has the symptoms of these conditions, call 911 or take them to the emergency room immediately.

Not all risk factors for coronary artery disease are avoidable. But at least one quarter of all deaths due to heart disease and stroke are preventable, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Many conditions can be reversed or controlled with a combination of lifestyle changes and, in some cases, medication.

If you’re at risk for a circulatory system disease, work with your doctor to control conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. You can also take steps and make lifestyle changes to prevent these conditions.

Tips for circulatory health

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • Exercise a minimum of 30 minutes a day, most days of the week.
  • Maintain a healthy, low-fat, low-cholesterol diet with more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  • Avoid trans fats and saturated fats, which are often found in processed foods and fast food.
  • Limit salt and alcohol intake.
  • Use relaxation and self-care to reduce stress.
Healthline

Best Life Diet Plan Review: Does It Work?

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The Promise

Could the plan that worked for Oprah work for you? The Best Life Diet comes from exercise physiologist and certified personal trainer Bob Greene, who worked closely with Oprah Winfrey for years.

Even though “diet” is in the title, this isn’t the sort of diet you hop on for a few days for quick weight loss. Instead, it’s got staying power: It’s a way of eating, and living, that helps you gradually change your eating habits so they stick with you for good.

You’ll go through three phases:

  1. Baby Steps (at least 4 weeks): Prepare your body for weight loss by being more active, revving up your metabolism, getting rid of six “problem foods,” and increasing the number of calories you burn.
  2. Get Moving (at least 4 weeks): Keep calories in check by increasing your activity at least one level, understanding emotional reasons for hunger, introducing “anything-goes calories,” and portion control.
  3. Your Best Life (ongoing): Add even more activity; cut back on saturated fat, sodium, and added sugar; eliminate trans fats; and include wholesome foods.

What You Can Eat and What You Can’t

You’ll eat three meals and at least one snack a day, take supplements, and drink lots of water.

Phase 1: Say yes to a fiber- and calcium-rich breakfast every day, healthy 100- to 200-calorie snacks, no eating for at least 2 hours before bedtime, and lots of water. Say no to six problem foods: alcohol, soda, trans fats, fried foods, white bread, and full-fat milk and yogurt.

Phase 2: This phase is all about controlling your portions. You’ll eat the same types of food as in Phase 1, but you’ll add “anything-goes calories,” with the amount depending on your activity level. In short, you have to earn them by being active.

Phase 3: You still keep portions in check, and you shift toward nutritious foods (leaner proteins, fruit, whole grains, colorful vegetables). You’ll also focus on the quality of your diet. Everything you eat should offer great taste, vitamins, minerals, and nutrients you need to be satisfied and stay healthy.

The Best Life Diet doesn’t allow alcohol in Phase 1 but allows it in moderation in Phases 2 and 3 as part of your “anything-goes calories.”

Level of Effort: Medium

Limitations: In Phase 1, you can’t have alcohol, soda, trans fats, fried foods, white bread, or full-fat milk and yogurt. In Phases 2 and 3, you may use some of those foods as your “anything-goes calories.”

Cooking and shopping: You’ll cook or eat as usual, as long as you stick to the Best Life guidelines and add the vitamins and supplements Greene suggests.

Packaged foods or meals? No.

In-person meetings? No.


Exercise:
Required. You’ll do cardio and strength training, ramping it up with each phase of the diet. It will take time, ranging from 90 minutes a week to 6 hours a week or more.

Does It Allow for Dietary Restrictions or Preferences?

Vegetarians and vegans: You can easily adjust this diet to make it work for you.

Low-salt: The plan slowly phases out high-sodium foods. But if you’re closely watching your sodium levels, check food labels. The same goes for fat.

Gluten-free: This diet doesn’t specifically avoid gluten, so check food labels carefully. 

What Else You Should Know

Cost: None besides your groceries.

Support: There isn’t; you can buy Bob Greene’s book, which provides more details of the diet. 

What Dr. Melinda Ratini Says:

Does It Work?

With its emphasis on nutrition and exercise, The Best Life Diet can help put you on the road to a healthy weight. It’s not a fad diet; it’s a holistic approach to creating a healthy lifestyle.

Research on similar diets that emphasize fruits, vegetables, and lean protein while cutting back on fat, sugar, and fried foods have been shown to be an effective way to drop the pounds and help prevent some chronic conditions.

Because this plan may mean big changes, you will have to be motivated for the long-haul.

Is It Good for Certain Conditions?

Diets like this one that help you reach and maintain a healthy weight can help prevent and treat diabetes and heart disease.

Cutting out fried foods and high-fat dairy also will help bring down your cholesterol levels and fight heart disease.

If you have high blood pressure, the diet’s emphasis on low-salt foods can be just what the doctor ordered. But if you are on a low-salt diet, you will have to read labels to be sure you stay within your limits.

The Final Word

The Best Life Diet calls for cooking and eating a wide variety of tasty foods. You will even be able to treat yourself on this plan.

Eating out may be a challenge. Plan to learn your way around the farmer’s market and your own kitchen to get the most out of this diet.

You won’t have to buy any premade foods, but you will have to take some supplements such as multivitamins, omega-3, and calcium if you are not getting enough from food.

If you have a medical condition or take any medicines, talk with your doctor before starting any supplements, especially if you are on blood thinners.

Buying the book is the only expense unless you opt for the online support.

What you will have to invest is some time and energy if you are going to be successful with the Best Life Diet. It starts with a moderate amount of exercise and works up to almost an hour on most days.

Check with your doctor first if you have not been active or have any medical conditions.

Lentis/Obesity and Diets in Economic Classes in the United States

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Wiki Code November 26, 2012

Introduction[edit]

Figure 1. Change in obesity rates in America based on economic class.[1]

Obesity is defined as having a Body Mass Index (BMI) greater than 30 due to too much fat.
[2] On average, an uninsured non-obese person spends $512 per year on medical costs, whereas as an uninsured obese person spends $3,271 per year. This totals to approximately $190 billion in obesity related medical costs per year for America.[3]

Figure 1 shows obesity rates in four economic classes of the United States in the early 1970s and 2000s. The figure indicates that the obesity rates for all the economic classes in the US have increased within those 30 years. Currently, about one in every three Americans is obese [4]. However, throughout the years, low-income Americans have consistently displayed higher obesity rates than high-income Americans.

Each month the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) develops four food budgets: Thrifty, Low-Cost, Moderate-Cost, and Liberal Food Plans. Each plan or budget corresponds to different income levels. The USDA claims that despite the differences in total cost of the four plans, each provides a healthy and nutritious diet, suggesting that all Americans are financially able to live a healthy life [5].

If this is the case, then why does America still have one of the highest obesity rates in the world? To answer this question, we examined the following socioeconomic factors that affect an American’s food choices.

Food Choice[edit]

Figure 2. Modern Food Pyramid for a healthy diet

Excluding genetic factors, much of variation in body weight is due to behavior. Analysis of socioeconomic factors explains how individuals choose to allocate their limited resources, including time and money, to different food choices.

Accessibility[edit]

The major obstacles that impede people of lower income groups from getting healthy food are food costs and physical accessibility. Lower income individuals tend to purchase food with lower unit cost, which tend to have denser calorie content. [6] This phenomenon explains the lower income groups’ tendency to consume higher calorie content food, or more commonly referred to as “junk food”.
Low-income groups are also limited in their access to healthy food. Poorer communities tend to have scarcer healthy grocery stores. [7] Also, people in these communities are less likely to own a car, which makes it more difficult for them to travel to other areas to shop for healthy groceries.

Values[edit]

People of different economic statuses place different levels of importance on their health. Although people of both low and high income tend to place great value in healthy eating, people of low economic status tend to devote less energy, money and time to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. [8] People’s expectation of their future also influences their prioritization of healthy living. Generally, people with better education and higher income are more forward-looking and hold an optimistic view about their future, and are thus more willing to invest their limited resources in maintaining their own health. [9] In general, these socioeconomic factors alter people’s attitudes towards health and show that overall, a greater value is place on health in higher income groups. The higher value people put on health, the more they are motivated to keep a healthy diet.

Education[edit]

Nutritional education and awareness helps people to obtain, interpret, and apply information that shapes their knowledge and attitudes about diet. Low-income people often are not aware of the fat or calorie content in foods that they frequently consume, and thus are not equipped with the knowledge to choose the healthier option. For example, only 47% of low income Americans know that a hot dog contains more calories than ham [10].

Culture and Perception[edit]

Culture can shape dietary habits, and plays an important role in the different obesity rates between income groups. There is a nonuniform distribution of ethnic groups among economic classes; hispanic and black cultures are prevalent in the low-income category [11]. The foods typically eaten by both of these races is high in fat content [12], contributing to obesity within the low-income class. Among different ethnic groups, standards of ideal body image vary. For example, the perceived ideal body size of African American women is significantly larger than that of white women. [13] This perception of the “ideal” appearance affects if and how people pursue a healthy lifestyle. People eat a certain way to achieve or maintain the appearance they want. The USDA showed that nearly 60% of overweight people consider themselves healthy in terms of body weight, significantly more than those who are actually in the “healthy” BMI category [14]. Thus, people may not be willing to change their eating habits because they do not see themselves as being overweight.

Other Factors Influencing Obesity Rates[edit]

Physical Activity[edit]

Low-income groups are likely to be less physically active. This trend is due to a variety of factors, including limited access to recreational facilities, unsafe neighborhood conditions, long commutes to and from work, and lack of time [15]. Exercise can be termed a “luxury” for those who have an hour of free time away from work or family responsibilities. Low-income Americans often do not have this free time to dedicate to exercise, hindering them from leading a healthy lifestyle.

Occupation[edit]

Many people in low-income situations work jobs with inflexible hours. Their schedules are often not conducive to a regular exercise routine. Additionally, low-income workers may toil long hours and during night shifts. The labor/time consuming type of work exhaust them and leave them with few energy for exercise or cooking. At that point, it is much more convenient to pick up unhealthy fast food than to cook a healthy meal. In addition, irregular sleep time also leads to a higher risk of obesity. Thus, employees that work in such conditions are more susceptible to obesity [16].

Promoting Healthy Choices[edit]

Many organizations and individuals have recognized the need to address the obesity crisis in America, and have taken action to promote healthy choices. However, these efforts are often unnoticed, unappreciated, or even opposed by the people they are trying to help.

Campaigns[edit]

Figure 3. Let’s Move! logo for Bridgeport, CT
  • Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” Campaign aims to promote healthy lifestyles among children by encouraging healthy eating and physical activity. The program educates low-income families on nutritional dining options, and supports the providing of healthy foods in schools [17]. However, critics of the campaign suggest that it increases the stigma against overweight children rather than raising awareness of healthy eating in the context of diverse body shapes and sizes. [18].
  • American Heart Association’s “National Eating Healthy” Day. The AHA dedicates one day each year to the promotion of healthy eating in the workplace. Businesses and organizations are encouraged to participate to support healthy lifestyles in their employees [19].
  • HEAL (Healthy Eating Active Living) Cities Campaign [20] is a California-based statewide initiative that focuses on three main issues:
  1. Effective land use to positively affect the health of individuals living in that area
  2. Ensuring that cities have the proper tools and resources to attract healthy food vendors
  3. Improving employee wellness

Legislation[edit]

Over the past 10 years, demand for federal, state, and municipal laws to address the “obesity epidemic” in America has increased. Lawmakers have responded with legislation to promote healthy awareness, limit consumer calorie intake, and prevent inadvertent consumption of unhealthy foods. For example, part of President Obama’s healthcare plan states that all chain restaurants with 20+ locations must post calorie counts of each food item on the menus. The postings give consumers the opportunity to limit their calorie intake by providing them with information needed to make a healthy choice. In the state of New York, this law is already in place. Researchers tracked orders at fast food restaurants in low-income neighborhoods before and after the instatement of calorie counts [21]. Although 27 percent of customers claimed that the calorie postings would affect their choices, there was no change in the total number of calories ordered. The study suggests that people simply order what tastes good, regardless of the nutritional value. This apathetic consumer attitude could stem from a lack of education; low-income consumers often do not know how many calories are too many. Other examples of legislation to promote a healthier lifestyle are listed below:

  • NYC bans large sodas: In New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has enacted a law to ban vendors from selling sodas greater than 16 oz in size [22].
  • San Francisco bans Happy Meals: In San Francisco, it is illegal to include any sort of free incentivizing item (such as a toy in a Happy Meal) with a meal containing over 600 calories. However, McDonald’s avoided this limitation by charging a mere 10 cents for a toy with the Happy Meal [23].
  • Cities ban added trans-fats: Individual cities such as Baltimore [24] and Cleveland [25] adopted bans on added trans-fats in restaurant foods. The effort served as an attempt to lower incidence of heart disease and obesity within the cities.
  • Anti junk food laws in schools: In 2010, as part of the Let’s Move! Campaign, President Obama signed the “Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act”. The bill authorizes the use of federal funding to provide low-income students with access to healthy food options at school [26]. School junk food regulations have also been passed on a state-by-state basis. For example, schools in California cannot serve foods with over 175 calories per item [27] The legislation is believed to be effective; students who live in states with strongly enforced laws against junk food gain less weight between fifth and eighth grades than those in states with loosely enforced laws [28].

Opposition[edit]

Much of the opposition facing legislation to promote health awareness is centered around the quintessential American value of liberty. One definition of liberty is “the freedom […] or power of doing, thinking speaking, etc. according to choice.” Many Americans feel that by imposing limits on what they can eat, lawmakers are impinging on their right to choose. In the case of the New York City large soda ban, 60% of New Yorkers opposed the ban [29] because they felt they had been stripped of their personal choice. The implementation of junk food laws in schools faces especially stringent public opposition. In 2011, New Jersey governor Chris Christie spoke the consenting opinion of many Americans when he said, “I don’t want the government deciding what you can eat and what you can’t eat.” [30]. Personal liberty is a privilege that many Americans are unwilling to sacrifice, even if it would result in healthier lifestyles for themselves or their children.

Conclusion[edit]

An individual’s choices depend on his or her values, which are in turn is influenced by his or her environment. Economic status is an important factor that governs the external influences of all Americans, and impacts the choices they make. However, no matter the socioeconomic environment, the decision to lead a healthy lifestyle belongs with the individual. Americans highly value the freedom of personal choice, and consistently oppose any restriction of this right.

References[edit]

  1. Hitti, Miranda. (May 2, 2005). Rich-Poor Gap Narrowing in Obesity. Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20050502/rich-poor-gap-narrowing-in-obesity
  2. Dugdale, DC; Vorvick, LJ; Zieve, D. Obesity. PubMed Health. May 12, 2012. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0004552/
  3. Bengley, S. As America’s Waistline Expands, Costs Soar. Reuters. April 30, 2012. Retrieved from http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/04/30/us-obesity-idUSBRE83T0C820120430
  4. Food Research Action Center. Retrieved from http://frac.org/initiatives/hunger-and-obesity/obesity-in-the-us/
  5. The Low-Cost, Moderate-Cost, and Liberal Food Plans, 2007. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007. Retrieved from http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/FoodPlans/MiscPubs/FoodPlans2007AdminReport.pdf
  6. The Rising Cost of Low-Energy-Density Foods
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Volume 107, Issue 12, December 2007, Pages 2071–2076
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2007.09.009
  7. Treuhaft S., Karpyn A., (2010), The Grocery Gap, PolicyLink, retrieved from http://www.policylink.org/atf/cf/%7B97C6D565-BB43-406D-A6D5-ECA3BBF35AF0%7D/FINALGroceryGap.pdf
  8. Marmot M., The Influence Of Income On Health: Views Of An Epidemiologist, Health Affairs, 21, no.2 (2002):31-46, retrieved from http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/21/2/31.short
  9. Zhang Y., Fishbach, A., Dhar R., When Thinking Beats Doing: The Role of Optimistic Expectations in Goal-Based Choice, Journal of Consumer Research, Inc. Vol. 34, retrieved from http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/ayelet.fishbach/research/ZFD_JCR07.pdf
  10. http://www.fns.usda.gov/Ora/menu/Published/NutritionEducation/Files/FSPDietSum.htm
  11. Simms M.C., Fortuny K., Henderson K.,(2009), Racial and Ethnic Disparities Among Low-Income Families, The Urban Institute, retrieved from http://www.urban.org/uploadedpdf/411936_racialandethnic.pdf
  12. Gans, K. M., Burkholder, G. J., Risica, P. M., & Lasater, T. M. (2003). Baseline fat-related dietary behaviors of white, Hispanic, and black participants in a cholesterol screening and education project in New England. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 103(6), 699–706; discussion 706. doi:10.1053/jada.2003.50135
  13. Parnell K, Sargent R, Thompson SH, Duhe SF, Valois RF, Kemper RC., (1996), Black and white adolescent females’ perceptions of ideal body size, The Journal of School Health, 66(3):112-8, retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8857160
  14. Mancino L., Lin B., and Ballenger N., (2004), The Role of Economics in Eating Choices and Weight Outcomes, United States Department of Agriculture, retrieved from http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/33781/1/ai030791.pdf
  15. Low Income Populations and Physical Activity, Retrieved from:http://www.bms.com/Documents/together_on_diabetes/2012-Summit-Atlanta/Physical-Activity-for-Low-Income-Populations-The-Health-Trust.pdf
  16. Schulte, P. A., Wagner, G. R., Ostry, A., Blanciforti, L. A., Cutlip, R. G., Krajnak, K. M., … Miller, D. B. (2007). Work, Obesity, and Occupational Safety and Health. American Journal of Public Health, 97(3), 428–436. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2006.086900
  17. http://www.letsmove.gov/about
  18. Brown, E. (2011, June 15). The Not So Popular Criticism of the Let’s Move Campaign. Madame Noire. Retrieved December 14, 2012, from http://madamenoire.com/61405/the-not-so-celebrated-side-of-the-lets-move-campaign/
  19. American Heart Association’s National Eating Healthy Day Resource Guide, Retrieved from: http://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@gsa/documents/downloadable/ucm_446036.pdf)
  20. http://www.healcitiescampaign.org/
  21. Elbel, B., Kersh, R., Brescoll, V. L., & Dixon, L. B. (2009). Calorie Labeling And Food Choices: A First Look At The Effects On Low-Income People In New York City. Health Affairs, 28(6), w1110–w1121. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.28.6.w1110
  22. Grynbaum, M. M. (2012, September 13). Health Board Approves Bloomberg’s Soda Ban. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/14/nyregion/health-board-approves-bloombergs-soda-ban.html
  23. San Francisco Happy Meal Toy Ban Takes Effect, Sidestepped By McDonald’s. (2011, November 30). Huffington Post. Retrieved December 14, 2012, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/30/san-francisco-happy-meal-ban_n_1121186.html
  24. http://www.baltimorehealth.org/info/Trans%20fat/Trans%20Fat%20Ban%20Enforcement%20Procedure.pdf
  25. http://www.city.cleveland.oh.us/clnd_images/PDF/Mayor/TransFatComplaintInfo.pdf
  26. http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/Child_Nutrition_Fact_Sheet_12_10_10.pdf
  27. http://nojunkfood.org/?page_id=32
  28. Taber, D. R., Chriqui, J. F., Perna, F. M., Powell, L. M., & Chaloupka, F. J. (2012). Weight Status Among Adolescents in States That Govern Competitive Food Nutrition Content. Pediatrics, 130(3), 437–444. doi:10.1542/peds.2011-3353
  29. Grynbaum, M. M., & Connelly, M. (2012, August 22). Most New Yorkers Oppose Bloomberg’s Soda Ban. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/23/nyregion/most-new-yorkers-oppose-bloombergs-soda-ban.html
  30. “Let”s Move!’ Oversteps its Bounds. (2011, March 2). Human Events: Powerful Conservative Voices. Retrieved December 14, 2012, from http://www.humanevents.com/2011/03/02/lets-move-oversteps-its-bounds/


Definition of Lifestyle at

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

or life style, life-style

[ lahyf-stahyl ]

/ ˈlaɪfˌstaɪl /


noun

the habits, attitudes, tastes, moral standards, economic level, etc., that together constitute the mode of living of an individual or group.

adjective

pertaining to or catering to a certain lifestyle: unhealthy lifestyle choices; lifestyle advertising; a luxury lifestyle hotel.

(of a drug) used to treat a medical condition that is not life-threatening or painful: lifestyle drugs for baldness.

“Are you a healthy eater?” – QUIZ for Intermediate and Advanced students

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle



sldiaz
Panama

GREAT CONTRIBUTION, AS USUAL 🙂         posted by
sldiaz

Thanks a lot, very interesting, colorful, and useful activity!!!



Anabelita
Portugal

         posted by
Anabelita

Thank you for sharing.



Lucka20
Brazil

Great worksheet! Thanks for sharing.         posted by
Lucka20



newuser07
Uruguay

         posted by
newuser07

So creative Mena!!! you´re a professional designer 🙂 Thanks for sharing



Cirrus
Serbia

         posted by
Cirrus

Really great! Thanks a lot!



teresaraiva
Portugal

Love your work. Thanks a lot, Mena!         posted by
teresaraiva



mmargalef
Spain

as newuser said: very professional!         posted by
mmargalef

thanks a lot Mena!:)



Pacchy
Argentina

Thanks!!         posted by
Pacchy



Logos
Malaysia

Very nice layout – thanks soooo much         posted by
Logos



sirah
Argentina

Gorgeous! thanks for sharing!         posted by
sirah



yenn
Mexico

great!         posted by
yenn

Thanks a lot!



danieladm
Brazil

PERFECT!!!!!         posted by
danieladm

I loved it! Thaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaanks!!!



mcris
Brazil

         posted by
mcris

really fantastic



alex1968
Greece

W-O-W ! ! !         posted by
alex1968

Wonderful work as usual!!! I use your ws almost every week!!! Thanx!!!



rotkappe
Germany

         posted by
rotkappe

You always prepare interesting topics for the classroom. Thank you, my dear!



frenchfrog
France

         posted by
frenchfrog

Thank you! (18.02.09)



CHARMED ONE
Mexico

Amazing Mena!! Always choosing the right topic with the right worksheet .         posted by
CHARMED ONE



vairor2
Italy

thanks a lot!………..great as usual!!!         posted by
vairor2



Kamilam
Poland

         posted by
Kamilam

Wonderful! Your work is amazing Mena! Thank you so much for sharing!



Stassy
Belarus

Thank you SOOOO much, Katiana!!!! :-)))         posted by
Stassy



isiss
Poland

Great! Thanks!          posted by
isiss



customer
Italy

         posted by
customer

GREAT! Thx a lot Mena!



chorima
Spain

         posted by
chorima

your 13-year olds (and the rest) are REALLY LUCKY with you as a teacher.THANKS A LOT. another masterpiece!



pandabear
United States

Another FANTASTIC worksheet!         posted by
pandabear

Much appreciated!



chrabonsc
Poland

         posted by
chrabonsc

Thanks a lot great work !!!



ana79
Spain

         posted by
ana79

thanks for sharing



Vanessa G L
Spain

         posted by
Vanessa G L

fantastic as all your food collection!



Greek Professor
Greece

Nicely presented.. thank you         posted by
Greek Professor



svetic
Kazakhstan

Thanks!         posted by
svetic



Ana B
Portugal

         posted by
Ana B

Thanks for another great printable!



joebcn
Andorra

I´M IMPRESSED! ANOTHER ONE OF YOUR GEMS.THANKS A LOT         posted by
joebcn



miss-williams
Portugal

         posted by
miss-williams

Thanks a lot!



yunaked
Algeria

         posted by
yunaked

Original !Thanks a lot!!!



Montypython
France

Wow!!!! AWESOME****** !!!! !thanks so much dear Mena!!!!!!!!!!! Big hugs!!!! 🙂         posted by
Montypython



fayefaye
Hong Kong

         posted by
fayefaye

many thanks



gilorit
Israel

Thank you Mena 😉         posted by
gilorit



nelly36
Latvia

Great quiz! Thanks a lot for sharing!         posted by
nelly36



valedanilova
Macedonia

WONDERFUL!!!!         posted by
valedanilova

Very nice and useful activity! Thanks a lot, Mena! All the best!



Natal1a
Russian Federation

Thank you, dear menna! You are really professional in making such wonderful worksheets. That´s cute as usual!         posted by
Natal1a



ccuschieri
Malta

         posted by
ccuschieri

Thanks a million for your worksheets! I love them and they´re also very helpful! =)



manuelanunes3
Portugal

Thanks 🙂         posted by
manuelanunes3



Ingerborg
Sweden

Thanks! Just what I need.         posted by
Ingerborg



veronika74
Hungary

         posted by
veronika74

Thank you.



jadd
Morocco

Thanks for sharing! really useful!! :))))         posted by
jadd



nadine85
Argentina

Great work!!! Thanks for sharing         posted by
nadine85



eduran
Spain

         posted by
eduran

THANKS A LOT!!!



isabelzr
Spain

         posted by
isabelzr

REALLY NICE, USEFUL AND INTERESTING. THANKS A LOT FILOMENA



Nines Picado
Spain

         posted by
Nines Picado

Thanks again for sharing all your wonderful worksheets.



cely
Argentina

         posted by
cely

Really nice and useful Mena! Thanks a lot!!



Ania Z
Poland

Thanks for sharing! A wonderful ws!         posted by
Ania Z



Anusia
Poland

         posted by
Anusia

Marvellous.Thanks for sharing.



missola
Palestine

         posted by
missola

nice topic
thanx for sharing



domnitza
Romania

         posted by
domnitza

GREAT!
thanks a lot!



mpotb
Spain

         posted by
mpotb

I am speechless….. What an excellent worksheet!!!! Wonderful design, really interesting topic and content, really useful indeed!!! Thanks so much dear Mena!!!



Katia del Pilar
Peru

         posted by
Katia del Pilar

Thanks.
🙂



Babi965
United Kingdom

         posted by
Babi965

Excellent contribution, thank you very much.



yolprica
Spain

incredible how nice your worksheets are         posted by
yolprica



spring
Turkey

Incredibly beautiful and charming layout..Thanks Mena:)))         posted by
spring



Gataferrugem
Portugal

Fabulous Worksheet!!!! Thanks!         posted by
Gataferrugem



David G
Spain

         posted by
David G

Amazing!!! As usual.



Ivona
Serbia

thanks .. you´ve saved me! 🙂         posted by
Ivona



echo_lin
China

good         posted by
echo_lin

you have saved me!



flob
France

         posted by
flob

thanks!!!!!!!!!!!



mecury001
China

         posted by
mecury001

Thanks Mena!!! I will definitely use it in my esl class!!!



gonzalo1996
Chile

Nice!!!!!!         posted by
gonzalo1996

VERY ATTRACTIVE AND INTERESTING FOR YOUR STUDENTS AND MINE



gonzalo1996
Chile

Nice!!!!!!         posted by
gonzalo1996

VERY ATTRACTIVE AND INTERESTING FOR YOUR STUDENTS AND MINE



mooleymoon
United Arab Emirates

great job         posted by
mooleymoon



bosatshoog
United Arab Emirates

what a wonderful quize?         posted by
bosatshoog

i love it a lot and seem like i am not a very healthy eater



Bill
Spain

         posted by
Bill

Thanks. nice worksheet



cecio_13
Argentina

thanks         posted by
cecio_13



misha87
Czech Republic

         posted by
misha87

Simply GREAT!!!! Thanks



pink4 (Virginia)
Uruguay

Thanks a lot!!!         posted by
pink4 (Virginia)



zeline
France

Thanks!          posted by
zeline



rdaporta
Spain

WONDERFUL WORKSHEET. MANY THANKS!!!!         posted by
rdaporta



cacucacu
Argentina

         posted by
cacucacu

Super! Thank you for sharing! I will use it with my nine year students.
Thanks again!



T.Salem
Saudi Arabia

Great worksheet         posted by
T.Salem

A very nice worksheet!!



mguidich
Qatar

thanks!!!!!!!!!!         posted by
mguidich

i find yor work efficient for my students



johanne23232
Israel

         posted by
johanne23232

simply fantastic, thank you!



MrsUH
Germany

Just what I need, thanks so much!         posted by
MrsUH



Anna P
Brazil

I almost missed it!         posted by
Anna P

Thanks, Mena.



mabevi
Chile

GREAT         posted by
mabevi

yOUR MATERIAL IS AMAZING 🙂



mohammadsaleh
Palestine

That is great         posted by
mohammadsaleh

It is a good quiz to show if you are on the right way or not ……….Thank you



liquidnuance
Japan

Thanks!         posted by
liquidnuance

Looking forward to using this as a way to introduce the film, “Supersize Me”.



g.kabelkova
Czech Republic

         posted by
g.kabelkova

Thank a lot! That´s what I need.



stefemma
France

         posted by
stefemma

thanks a lot! 😉



psamaniego
Ecuador

         posted by
psamaniego

Thanks for your great stuff!



Kohaku
Japan

Thank you!!! ***** Arigato Gozaimasu*********         posted by
Kohaku



rdaporta
Spain

Wonderful as usual!!!!!!!!!!!!!!         posted by
rdaporta



bernardina
Spain

         posted by
bernardina

I love this worksheet! Thanks!!!



nikita2008
Argentina

Well done!!         posted by
nikita2008



verybouncyperson
Spain

         posted by
verybouncyperson

Fantastic worksheet! Thanks a lot 🙂



moonsoler
Spain

I love it         posted by
moonsoler

I haven´t downloaded this worksheet yet, but I am a great fun of your quizzes. They are always very useful, well presented and fun.



moonandstars
Portugal

         posted by
moonandstars

thanks



Missbrittany
France

Extremely useful ! Thanks for sharing!         posted by
Missbrittany



elfelena
Russian Federation

Lovely! thanks a lot!         posted by
elfelena



Fabiola Salinas
Argentina

         posted by
Fabiola Salinas

Can´t be more appealing & useful!!! Always sharing worthy material!!! Super thanks!!! Fabiola :o)



madamev
France

         posted by
madamev

very good job, thanks a lot!



madamev
France

         posted by
madamev

very good job, thanks a lot!



Minie
France

         posted by
Minie

Just what I need !!! Thanks a lot ! Well done !



rero18
Saudi Arabia

Are you healthy eater         posted by
rero18

thanks alot for efforts i like the idea



rero18
Saudi Arabia

         posted by
rero18

thanks alot my dear



rero18
Saudi Arabia

         posted by
rero18

very interesting



rero18
Saudi Arabia

exercise         posted by
rero18

English Language for Second Grade Secondary
Worksheet
1 Unit
3 Lesson
Word study – Fire Subject
To match some words with its own meanings Objective
10 Time allowed
In cooperation with your group , match the following words with its own meanings
Instructions

( A ) ( B )
1- experiment a- come out accidently
2- in addition b- try or test something
3- spill c- also
4- out in the open d- very
e- outside
*********************************************************************
English Language for Second Grade Secondary
Worksheet
1 Unit
3 Lesson
Word study – Fire Subject
To match some words with its own meanings Objective
10 Time allowed
In cooperation with your group , match the following words with its own meanings
Instructions
( A ) ( B )
1- experiment a- come out accidently
2- in addition b- try or test something
3- spill c- also
4- out in the open d- very



OlgaPrih
Ukraine

         posted by
OlgaPrih

Thanks for sharing. It´s great!



mahmoudnasr71
Jordan

Asouf         posted by
mahmoudnasr71

Great worksheet. it´s really benefecial



segpa
France

thanks a lot!         posted by
segpa

Wah! This worksheet looks great to me! Thanks a lot for sharing!



Alisunya
Ukraine

Thanks a million! Incredibly helpful!         posted by
Alisunya



Baadache
Algeria

It a nice work, I like it         posted by
Baadache



allakoalla
Latvia

         posted by
allakoalla

Perfect as always! Thanks a lot!



COLOMBO
Ukraine

         posted by
COLOMBO

THANK YOU!



gmichoud
Switzerland

         posted by
gmichoud

Thank you! Nice job. I change it to make my students create the questions…



busja
Ukraine

thankssssssss a lot))it´s great         posted by
busja



volga
United States

         posted by
volga

Out of this world!! Thank you again and again!!! ;o)



aniaa
Italy

         posted by
aniaa

Thank you for your worksheets Mena!interesting and useful!
and thank you for your template, I used it for my ws about Hip Hop! it was perfect for that topic…;O)



Twinkerbell
Portugal

         posted by
Twinkerbell

Great, as usual 🙂 Thanks



ptienchiks
Ukraine

         posted by
ptienchiks

It´s great. Thanks a lot for sharing!!!! 🙂



ebdellikarima
Tunisia

         posted by
ebdellikarima

i like it it´s wonderful



wakebeauty
Brazil

WOW!!! SIMPLY AMAZING!!         posted by
wakebeauty

01.05.10



Hijab
Brazil

         posted by
Hijab

Thank you, Mena:)



vickaf
Argentina

         posted by
vickaf

thanks!!!!!!



Phen
ประเทศไทย

Wow! So great.         posted by
Phen

I like it.I am waiting for my point to download yours. Thanks.



Phen
ประเทศไทย

Thanks.         posted by
Phen

I can download. Huyyy!



ab25
France

thanks a lot!!!         posted by
ab25



katerinavolenikova
Czech Republic

         posted by
katerinavolenikova

GREAT WORK :))



kpou
Belgium

         posted by
kpou

Perfect thks 🙂



Faurfab
France

         posted by
Faurfab

Thanks!



sorokaira
Ukraine

Thank you!         posted by
sorokaira



sorinadan
Romania

         posted by
sorinadan

I love it! I will use it in January as I start Unit Food With The 7th form. Thank you a lot! Happy holidays for you too!



zainah2000
United Arab Emirates

         posted by
zainah2000

very good Mena. Thanks



Jesse69
France

         posted by
Jesse69

Great as usual !!!!!!!!!! You are FABULOUS !! Thanxxx again for sharing !



perma
Greece

thank you!         posted by
perma

just what I needed 🙂



dodonadeen
Saudi Arabia

         posted by
dodonadeen

Great work.Thank you



luly2286
Spain

         posted by
luly2286

Thanks for sharing! amazing as usual!



thanhcaibe
Vietnam

         posted by
thanhcaibe

Thank you very much.



tiempos85
Costa Rica

Are you a healthy eater_         posted by
tiempos85

Thanks so much! I love your creativity and imaginating!



sophia0806
France

         posted by
sophia0806

THANKS A LOT DEAR MENA! HAVE A GREAT SUNDAY!



bitudeniz
Turkey

         posted by
bitudeniz

thank you very much again



lethulan88
Vietnam

         posted by
lethulan88

Thanks for sharing! Good luck!



mish.cz
Czech Republic

         posted by
mish.cz

Thank you very much, dear Mena, what a great contribution!



Tanagotchi
France

November 1st 2011         posted by
Tanagotchi

Thanks a lot ^^



baloochester
France

         posted by
baloochester

thanks so much :))))



acostik
Greece

         posted by
acostik

YOU ARE A WONDERFUL WORKSHEET CREATOR!



nourelhouda1
Tunisia

         posted by
nourelhouda1

thanks for sharing



cgbraga
Portugal

         posted by
cgbraga

Great work, thanks! :)) Carla



traute
Spain

Are you a healthy eater?         posted by
traute

Very nice and useful, Mena!
Thanks a lot!
Traute



solracsilva
Colombia

         posted by
solracsilva

I love you Mena, continue being so creative!!!!!!!!!



solracsilva
Colombia

         posted by
solracsilva

I love you Mena, continue being so creative!!!!!!!!!



EvaRamos
Panama

I didn´t have this one. Thanks, dear Mena 🙂         posted by
EvaRamos



lavilavi
Italy

         posted by
lavilavi

My students loved it!! Thanks for sharing! 🙂



mandrea1111
Uruguay

         posted by
mandrea1111

Great worksheet!! Thank you!!



debbiem
Israel

         posted by
debbiem

thanks



chuppacricri
France

         posted by
chuppacricri

Your worksheet are always really great. Thanks



azizi
Malaysia

are you a healthy eater ?         posted by
azizi

sooooooooooooo interesting and beneficial for my students



jackdaw
Russian Federation

         posted by
jackdaw

Thank yoy a lot! 🙂 It´s very interesting and useful!



[email protected]
Czech Republic

Great job!         posted by
[email protected]

Thank you for this useful worksheet.



ladzoya
Belarus

         posted by
ladzoya

thanks!



emma95
France

Healthy Eater Quiz         posted by
emma95

Very good work! I should say delicious!



traute
Spain

Healthy eater         posted by
traute

Thanks Mena, very nice!
Traute



AlexandraDores
Portugal

         posted by
AlexandraDores

Thanks for sharing.:)



SOUROURR
Tahiti

Are you a healthy eater?         posted by
SOUROURR

Thanks a lot!a nice work!



ju10
Brazil

         posted by
ju10

Thanks once more Mena. A special hug, Ju.



Rafael_Nadal
Egypt

what program do you use to design this plzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz????????         posted by
Rafael_Nadal

what program do you use to design this plzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz????????



hossam8090
Saudi Arabia

         posted by
hossam8090

thankyou



peregar
Spain

Thank you! Really interesting!         posted by
peregar



aouatef
Tunisia

Are you a healthy eater         posted by
aouatef

very helpful 🙂 thank you sooooooooooooooo much



noonninhell
United States

         posted by
noonninhell

thx 4 yr useful wrksht (^^) awesome



henryhan
China

A GREAT THANKS         posted by
henryhan

benefit a lot. thanks a lot.



Whiteboard Warrior
Japan

         posted by
Whiteboard Warrior

Thank you. It is a nice activity.



froggyteacher25
France

         posted by
froggyteacher25

Nice and interesting activity. Thank you.



mohamedthabet
Tunisia

Thanks for gathering all members.         posted by
mohamedthabet



miss_yanis
Argentina

         posted by
miss_yanis

Thanx! 🙂



hidden pearl
Bahrain

         posted by
hidden pearl

it is just what im looking for. u always inspire me. thank u mena



dackala
Serbia

         posted by
dackala

I´m speechless, thanks a lot!



owly
South Africa

Great         posted by
owly

Great, thank you! I wasn´t sure what you meant by “light foods” though?



CathieJ1
France

         posted by
CathieJ1

Amazing! Thanks for sharing!



CathieJ1
France

         posted by
CathieJ1

Amazing! Thanks for sharing!



rosalia*9
Algeria

         posted by
rosalia*9

Thanks for your worksheet.



dvergar248
Spain

This is one of the best worksheets I have ever seen         posted by
dvergar248

Congratulations



Andromaha
Ukraine

         posted by
Andromaha

Thanks a lot! A great worksheet that can make the lesson fun!!!!



gharbi2009
Tunisia

thank you mena         posted by
gharbi2009

you are a great asset to this page.



sandreen
France

         posted by
sandreen

great thanks!



elainelinda
Brazil

Thanks!         posted by
elainelinda

Thanks! I loved it!



Despinalina
Greece

love it !         posted by
Despinalina



Samiabibo
Tunisia

         posted by
Samiabibo

Love it Thank you



steelcity
France

Thank you!         posted by
steelcity

Great document! I often use some of your docs! But this one is exactly what I was looking for! 🙂



sarrah mohammed
Tunisia

Well-done ! great thanks for sharing !         posted by
sarrah mohammed



e-test
Greece

         posted by
e-test

thank you very much



David Lisgo
Japan

         posted by
David Lisgo

Thank you Mena!



Cariboo
France

         posted by
Cariboo

Thank you so much



Fouzeyah
United Arab Emirates

         posted by
Fouzeyah

Thank you so much it is a very helpful worksheet



morenopalomares
Spain

         posted by
morenopalomares

Thank you so much for your excellent work!



Flo la française
France

         posted by
Flo la française

Great worksheet, thanks !

Healthy Diet For Teenagers, Teenage Diet Plan, Teens Weight Loss Diet

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Healthy diet for teenagers plays an important role in lifestyle of young individuals. Engaging in healthy habits from early years of life ensures physical and mental health and fitness for years to come.

Unfortunately, nowadays, more and more teenagers become overweight and even obese. This is not a surprise, as the quality of food becomes poorer every year and the quantity we are advised to consume by dietitians and offered by popular chain restaurants increases dramatically and unreasonably.

The important part in teenage weight gain also plays lack of exercise. They spend more time in front of the computer or TV instead of being outdoors.

Consequently, this kind of lifestyle leads to excess weight, obesity and other potentially life threatening diseases. Therefore, it is very important to stop and reverse the weight gain in teenagers as early as possible.

Both teens and their parents need to realize that weight issues in youngsters are caused by overall unhealthy lifestyle and not just poor quality food. And to solve the problem they should try to include healthy habits into their everyday life.

But what about healthy diet for teenagers?

Of course there are. First of all, it is important to remember that young developing body requires lots of nurture to satisfy adequate growth.

If teenager will go on a calorie restricting diet or will exclude one or more food groups from his daily menu, such as in low carb or low fat diet, he will interfere with the normal body cell development causing dangerous and often irreversible changes in his or her body.

So it is essential to consume enough calories from variety of foods to ensure healthy development and strong immune system.

The two main healthy diet for teenagers rules are:

  • 1. Lose weight slowly but surely, do not seek fast results.
  • 2. Do not go on popular weight loss diets for adults as they will ruin your health.

The key to healthy diet for teenagers is to get rid of excess body fat and maintain healthy muscle weight.

This can be achieved through regular exercise and physical activity. Simple walking, jogging, running, or swimming are considered light cardio exercises that take an important part in any successful weight loss plan both for adults and especially teens.

These types of exercise are easy enough to perform and they speed up metabolism and let your body burn fat. Without being physically active it will be impossible to lose weight and be healthy.

So rule # 3 is:

EXERCISE, EXERCISE and EXERCISE every day!

Teenage Healthy Diet Plan

First of all, healthy diet for teenagers should never be as restrictive as some weight loss diets for adults are. The teenage diet menu should always be individually adjusted and consist of favorite and most tolerable foods.

For example, we all know that broccoli is healthy, but if you hate broccoli, do not force yourself to eat it. Choose something similar but more favorable, such as asparagus or spinach, or romaine lettuce salad.

Once or twice a week allow yourself a little treat in form of your favorite snack or ice cream or cake.

Never go cold turkey on your favorite food, as you will be craving it the most.

Gradual transformation will allow you to stay in peace with yourself and ensure great long term success. And do not forget to take your multivitamins and drink plenty of fresh water.

Sample Healthy Diet for Teenagers Menu

Day 1

  • Breakfast – 1 cup of cottage cheese with berries, 1 hard-boiled egg, 1 cup of low fat milk or tea.
  • Lunch – 5 oz of chicken breast, 1 bowl of vegetable soup, 1 baked potato.
  • Snack – 1 glass of vegetable juice or smoothie, 1 whole wheat toast with 1 teaspoon of butter.
  • Dinner – 3-5 oz fish with salad.

TIPS

  • Eat your breakfast, as the calories you receive in the morning give you energy for the whole day and never get stored as fat.
  • You may substitute chicken with turkey or lean red meat or fish. Always 
  • choose organic range free meat over farm raised animal meat.
  • Use variety of vegetable for your soup, and add legumes if you like.
  • Use olive oil and vinegar instead of creamy dressings.
  • Limit salt intake, but do not completely exclude it from your diet.
  • If you feel hungry during your meals, drink water and eat raw vegetables
  • and fruits.

Day 2

  • Breakfast – Omelet with 2 eggs and 2 slices of lean turkey, 1 whole bran toast, 1 cup of low fat milk or tea.
  • Lunch – 3-5 oz fish, salad, ½ cup brown rice.
  • Snack – Fruit salad with 1 tablespoon of peanut butter or walnuts.
  • Dinner – 1 cup of yogurt, 1 cup of cottage cheese with fruit.

Day 3

  • Breakfast – 2 whole bran toasts with sliced turkey, 2 tomatoes, 1 cup of tea or low fat milk.
  • Lunch – 1 bowl of vegetable soup, 1 egg, 1 baked potato, salad.
  • Snack – 1 cup of yogurt with whole grain English muffin.
  • Dinner – 5 oz chicken breast with salad, green tea.

Day 4

  • Breakfast – 1 hard boiled egg, 1 cup of warm whole grain cereal with berries, 1 cup of tea.
  • Lunch – 1 cup of vegetable bean soup, 1 omelet with mushrooms, salad.
  • Snack – Fruit salad with whole grain toast.
  • Dinner – 1 baked potato with low fat sour cream and cheese, cucumber salad.

TIPS

  • You may grill, broil or bake your chicken and fish, avoid fried 
    or sautéed meat as it has too much unhealthy fats.
  • Avoid processed and canned foods, sugar and sweet beverages. 
    If you crave sweets, eat fresh or dry fruit.
  • Do not forget to be happy and enjoy every minute of your
    precious life!

You will be amazed how quickly your young growing body will burn excess fat with the help of the above healthy diet for teenagers menu and regular exercise. Just remember, consistency is the key to your success!


Related articles:



Healthy Eating Planner

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Many people want to be healthier but don’t know where to start. The first step is to figure out areas for improvement. Ditch chronic dieting, food guilt and meal skipping. Commit to making healthy changes starting today. 

Discomfort with current weight or chronic health problems often motivates people to lose weight. Small changes make a big difference in weight loss and overall health. Lasting changes rarely take place overnight. Focus on daily choices to move toward
a healthier lifestyle.

A few small steps can be taken to lose weight:

  • Choose healthy snacks. Hummus and carrots or fruit and low-fat yogurt are smart choices for satisfying hunger between meals.
  • Track food intake. Eating extra calories can lead to weight gain over the course of a year. Paying attention to portions can ensure that every bite counts. 
  • Move more. Walk for 30–60 minutes to reduce disease risk and improve health.
  • Eat breakfast. Eating a healthy breakfast prevents snacking later in the day. 
  • Prepare food at home. Home-cooked meals are often lower in calories and have more variety than restaurant meals.

Making Every Calorie Count 

Healthy food choices do not have to be complicated. Individual food choices are less important than the overall pattern of eating. For instance, eating a piece of cake once in a while is different than the pattern of eating a piece of cake every day. 

An eating pattern should focus on nutrient-dense foods that are full of vitamins and minerals. Eating foods from all of the food groups is a good idea for balance. Include items from two food groups at every snack, and from three to five food groups
at every meal.

The food groups are

  • Dairy
  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Grains
  • Protein

Oils and fats also contain nutrients that are an important part of a healthy eating pattern. Dietary fats are found in both plant and animal foods. They supply calories for energy and help with the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. Oils and fats
add flavor to food and are important for nutrition but are high in calories and need to be eaten in moderation.

Understanding Food Labels

Choosing the right amount of food is a skill that can be developed.

Focus on daily choices to move toward a healthier lifestyle.

Check serving sizes. One container isn’t always one serving. Compare the container to what’s listed on the label as a serving size. Learning to read food labels can help with decision-making. There are three things to
remember when reading labels:

Pay attention to calories and avoid excess fats, sodium and added sugars. Added sugars are now listed on food labels to create awareness of sources of excess sugar. The recommended amount is no more than 36 grams of added sugar
per day for men and 25 grams for women. 

Focus on getting more fiber, vitamin D, calcium, iron and potassium. When choosing a food, 10% of these individual nutrients is good, while 20% or more is excellent.

Choosing the right amount of food to meet hunger is a skill that can be developed. Learning to read food labels and estimate portion sizes are two ways to practice this skill. Choosing proper portion sizes also helps prevent food waste. 

Beverage Choices Matter

Beverage choices contribute to total daily calories. Beverages can be nourishing; however, be aware of the empty-calorie beverage choices that can add significantly to daily total calories.  

Beverage choices are especially important
for young children. Research shows that what children drink from birth through age 5 can have a big impact on their health since beverages are a big part of what they consume during this critical life stage. New recommendations by health care
professionals include plain water for hydration and plain pasteurized milk for nutrition. A limit on 100% juice consumption and limits or restrictions on added sugars in beverages are recommended. 

Be Active … Get Moving!

Physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. The benefits of regular movement include:

  • More energy
  • Less stress
  • Better sleep
  • Lower risk of chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes and heart disease

Physical activity can be in the form of exercise (jogging, walking, swimming) or everyday activities (gardening, car washing, stair climbing). Do it all at once or break it into smaller increments, aiming for 30–60 minutes total. To be active,
simply start moving. 

Exercise should keep the heart rate elevated for a period of time. Thirty minutes of exercise, five days a week keeps the heart strong. Sixty to 90 minutes most days can help with weight loss goals or maintenance. 

Strength training exercises like weightlifting, push-ups, sit-ups or yoga are also important since they build muscle, improve balance and strengthen bones.

No time for physical activity? Consider these options:

  • Do jumping jacks or Pilates moves while watching TV.
  • Use break time at work to stretch, walk and do simple exercises like squats and arm circles.
  • Listen to a podcast while going for a walk or walk with a friend instead of sitting on the couch.

Make Healthier Choices Today

Small daily lifestyle changes can lead to better health. To get started, keep a food diary for a week, then evaluate it to see if a variety of foods from the food groups are included. For some people the simple act of writing what they eat and drink
improves the quality of their choices. 

For information on label reading, food groups, activity and more, download the Activity + Eating for Adults self-instructional booklet below.
 

Staying Healthy News — ScienceDaily

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

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Forty Percent of Dementia Cases Could Be Prevented or Delayed by Targeting 12 Risk Factors Throughout Life

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