• In 1981, William T. Jarvis, a fundamentalist 7th Day Adventist, a Christian cult born in the 19th century, wrote an article called ‘The Myth of the Healthy Savage’

https://centerforinquiry.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/quackwatch/savage.pdf

r/ketoscience - In 1981, William T. Jarvis, a fundamentalist 7th Day Adventist, a Christian cult born in the 19th century, wrote an article called 'The Myth of the Healthy Savage', but lost his faith over the years -> “Vegetarianism is riddled with delusional thinking from which even scientists …” class=”_2_tDEnGMLxpM6uOa2kaDB3 ImageBox-image media-element _1XWObl-3b9tPy64oaG6fax” src=”https://preview.redd.it/7gd5not084q51.png?width=713&format=png&auto=webp&s=876ed8f54d1b137df9270771954cacae67d765c8″ style=”max-height:700px”/></div>
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<p class=https://researchaffairs.llu.edu/about-us/history – Loma Linda University, a 7th Day created college, included his name too (also where Dr Ted Naiman went to school)

r/ketoscience - In 1981, William T. Jarvis, a fundamentalist 7th Day Adventist, a Christian cult born in the 19th century, wrote an article called 'The Myth of the Healthy Savage', but lost his faith over the years -> “Vegetarianism is riddled with delusional thinking from which even scientists …” class=”_2_tDEnGMLxpM6uOa2kaDB3 ImageBox-image media-element _1XWObl-3b9tPy64oaG6fax” src=”https://preview.redd.it/5qkitv6k54q51.png?width=851&format=png&auto=webp&s=c579af662a1a7259ebbfea5a549ebc42878956e2″ style=”max-height:700px”/></div>
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r/ketoscience - In 1981, William T. Jarvis, a fundamentalist 7th Day Adventist, a Christian cult born in the 19th century, wrote an article called 'The Myth of the Healthy Savage', but lost his faith over the years -> “Vegetarianism is riddled with delusional thinking from which even scientists …” class=”_2_tDEnGMLxpM6uOa2kaDB3 ImageBox-image media-element _1XWObl-3b9tPy64oaG6fax” src=”https://preview.redd.it/anhlx1xqd4q51.png?width=471&format=png&auto=webp&s=0797750e510626c5b560b12404ae2bf311628d6d” style=”max-height:700px”/></div>
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r/ketoscience - In 1981, William T. Jarvis, a fundamentalist 7th Day Adventist, a Christian cult born in the 19th century, wrote an article called 'The Myth of the Healthy Savage', but lost his faith over the years -> “Vegetarianism is riddled with delusional thinking from which even scientists …” class=”_2_tDEnGMLxpM6uOa2kaDB3 ImageBox-image media-element _1XWObl-3b9tPy64oaG6fax” src=”https://preview.redd.it/1op96l6ur4q51.png?width=476&format=png&auto=webp&s=d1decbe54beb1e5ab0a95077a90d54ea97a4ff5e” style=”max-height:700px”/></div>
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r/ketoscience - In 1981, William T. Jarvis, a fundamentalist 7th Day Adventist, a Christian cult born in the 19th century, wrote an article called 'The Myth of the Healthy Savage', but lost his faith over the years -> “Vegetarianism is riddled with delusional thinking from which even scientists …” class=”_2_tDEnGMLxpM6uOa2kaDB3 ImageBox-image media-element _1XWObl-3b9tPy64oaG6fax” src=”https://preview.redd.it/x13kpkfzr4q51.png?width=501&format=png&auto=webp&s=23b2da5d48a87230a7466e3998066dd24dbba7b4″ style=”max-height:700px”/></div>
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  • and then in 1996, he leaves religion, and writes about PCRM, a vegan medical group, in a negative light pushing back that it is not the optimal diet to prevent disease.

  • https://www.ncahf.org/articles/o-r/pcrm.html

    Physician’s Committee For Responsible Medicine (PCRM)

    William T. Jarvis, Ph.D.

    The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) is a nonprofit association that claims to promote “optimal diet for prevention of disease,” says there is evidence that humans don’t have a specific requirement for protein, and teaches that “too much dietary protein from animal sources is detrimental to health.” [1] PCRM’s reference to “animal sources” is key to understanding its true purpose. Its leader, Neal Barnard, MD, has been identified as medical adviser to the radical animal rights organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), and PCRM may be substantially funded by it. Animal activists are highly successful fundraisers. The combined budgets for 15 of the leading animal protection organizations exceeded $115 million in 1994 (PETA took in $12 million) [2]. In NCAHF’s view, PCRM is a propaganda machine whose press conferences are charades for disguising its ideology as news events.

    Vegetarian Super Sell

    Barnard extols the virtues of strict vegetarian (vegan) diets. He claims that when it comes to life span “It’s not genetics or fate that gives people long, healthy lives and cuts other people short; for those who want to take care of themselves, it all comes down to diet.” [3] Seventh-day Adventist’s (SDA) health has been studied by Loma Linda University’s School of Public Health for many years. They have found that vegetarian diet provides some protection from heart disease for men, but not women. Cancer incidence is lower among SDAs that the general population, but not better than meat-eating Mormons [4]. Both Mormons and SDAs abstain from tobacco, which probably accounts for most of the health benefits both enjoy. There is no indication from studies done among long-lived people that diet is much of a factor. Interviews of 1127 centenarians by the U.S. Social Security Administration from 1963-72 found that only four of them were vegetarians. Without knowing the proportion of vegetarians in the general population it is not possible to know whether this number is statistically significant, but the preponderance of nonvegetarians says something by itself [5]. Barnard’s idea that it is not genetics that gives people long healthy lives is refuted by a study of 100 (50 men and 50 women) in their tenth decade of life. When questioned about their lifestyles in their earlier years, the researchers concluded that “in many respects the coronary risk profile of these apparently healthy nonagenarians represents the mirror image of that of the contemporary coronary-prone middle-aged adult.” It appears that genetics protected these people from their lifestyles. Barnard speaks as if he had never heard of familial hypercholesterolemia, iron-overload genes, and other genetic factors in heart disease.

    Neal Barnard compares animal husbandry and dairying to tobacco raising. He claims that the USDA’s food group model is based upon industry influence and is tantamount to government support for tobacco. There is a big difference. Tobacco farmers receive support, but the government does not recommend smoking. Since 1964 the Surgeon General has condemned smoking, and the government has required a warning label on cigarettes. The USDA, and other nutrition and health science groups, have allowed for meatless eating in the protein group. Barnard’s appeal to cynicism is demagogic, and typical of ideologists who are on a mission to convert others to their way of thinking.

    • And then a year later – he writes: https://www.acsh.org/news/1997/04/01/why-i-am-not-a-vegetarian and strangely enough posts it on April Fool’s Day – but with quotes like “Vegetarianism is riddled with delusional thinking from which even scientists and medical professionals are not immune.” I doubt he’s joking. I haven’t read the whole thing – but it’s super interesting: Here are some quotes I did read:

    Why I Am Not a VegetarianBy Dr. William T. JarvisPosted: Tuesday, April 1, 1997

    Vegetarianism has taken on a “political correctness” comparable to the respectability it had in the last century, when many social and scientific progressives advocated it. Today, crusaders extol meatless eating not only as healthful but also as a solution to world hunger and as a safeguard of “Mother Earth.” The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) aggressively attacks the use of animal foods and has proposed its own food-groups model, which excludes all animal products.

    I disclaimed vegetarianism after many years of observance. Although the arguments in favor of it appear compelling, I have learned to be suspicious, and to search for hidden agendas, when I evaluate claims of the benefits of vegetarianism. Vegetarianism is riddled with delusional thinking from which even scientists and medical professionals are not immune.

    Don’t get me wrong: I know that meatless diets can be healthful, even desirable, for some people. For example: (a) Men with an iron-loading gene are better off without red meat, because it contains heme iron, which is highly absorbable and can increase their risk of heart disease. (b) Because vegetarian diets are likely to contain less saturated fat than nonvegetarian diets, they may be preferable for persons with familial hypercholesterolemia. (c) Vegetables contain phytochemicals that appear protective against colorectal cancer. (d) Homocysteinemia (elevated plasma homocysteine) approximately doubles the risk of coronary artery disease. Several congenital and nutritional disorders, including deficiencies of vitamins B6 and B12 and folic acid, can cause this condition. Since folic acid occurs mostly in vegetables, low intakes of the vitamin are less likely among vegetarians than among nonvegetarians. (e) Some people find that being a vegetarian helps to control their weight. Vegetarianism tends to facilitate weight control because it is a form of food restriction; and in our overfed society, food restriction is a plus unless it entails a deficit of some essential nutrient.

    However, one need not eliminate meat from one’s diet for any of the foregoing reasons. Apparently, it is ample consumption of fruits and vegetables, not the exclusion of meat, that makes vegetarianism healthful….

    2. The multifarious dietary practices of human populations belie the notion that humans are designed to be vegetarians rather than omnivores. For example, Australian aborigines consume insect larvae and reptiles, Eskimos eat raw meat, and traditional Hindus are vegetarians.

    The first SDA physician, John Harvey Kellogg (1852®¢1943), was a vegetarian zealot. Alonzo Baker, Ph.D., his former private secretary, told me of an incident that occurred circa 1939: Kellogg awakened him in the middle of the night and ordered him to board the morning train for Cleveland. There, Weston Price, D.D.S., who had just returned from the mysterious high north, was to give a report on Eskimo dietary habits. When Baker returned, he informed Kellogg of Price’s finding that Eskimos ate raw meat almost exclusively (eskimo literally means “raw meat eater”). Kellogg accused Price of lying.

    Eating by the Book?

    SDA vegetarianism is rooted in the Bible, according to which for food God gave humans “all plants that bear seed everywhere on earth, and every tree bearing fruit that yields seed” (Genesis 1:29). Meat is said to have become a part of the human diet after the Flood, when all plant life had been destroyed: “Every creature that lives and moves shall be food for you” (Genesis 9:3). Adventists are taught that the introduction of meat into the human diet at that time decreased the human life span from the more than 900 years of the first humans to today’s “three-score and ten.”

    I don’t believe that all research done by vegetarians is untrustworthy. My experience with the ongoing Seventh-day Adventist Health Study (SDAHS), a series of studies conducted from LLU School of Public Health, has been largely positive. Its chief researcher, the late Roland Phillips, M.D., Dr.P.H., was an outstanding scientist in whose objectivity I had the utmost confidence. He recognized the problem of the influence of social expectations on SDAs responding to questions about their lifestyle. Adventist groupthink makes it likely that SDAs will underreport activities disfavored by the church community (e.g., meat-eating, coffee drinking, and imbibing) and over-report those that are approved (e.g., dining meatlessly and exercising). Phillips seemed to feel that the benefits of vegetarianism per se were limited, and that one must take account of heredity, socioeconomic status, and the total SDA lifestyle. Abstention from smoking, access to state-of-the-art healthcare, and strong social support probably are responsible for most of the health benefits SDAs enjoy. The main problem with SDA vegetarian science is how the scientific information is used. To paraphrase an old Pennsylvania Dutch saying: Among SDAs, when the news about vegetarianism and health is good, “we hear it ever” ; when the news is not good, “we hear it never.”

    dem0n0cracy: My point in bringing this to your attention is that r/ketoscience doesn’t have to debunk every claim made against it when this bias against it permeates our society. It also shows what we’re up against – and it’s not simply a scientific argument. People and their beliefs matter – they might just call you a liar if they can’t entertain what you’re saying.

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