Education for Healthy Lifestyles

Presentation on theme: “Education for Healthy Lifestyles. Focus of the workshop KS1 Pupils should have the opportunity to learn: 1.what constitutes a healthy lifestyle including.”— Presentation transcript:

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Education for Healthy Lifestyles

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Focus of the workshop KS1 Pupils should have the opportunity to learn: 1.what constitutes a healthy lifestyle including the benefits of physical activity, rest, healthy eating and dental health 2.to recognise what they like and dislike, how to make real, informed choices that improve their physical and emotional health, to recognise that choices can have good and not so good consequences

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KS2 Building on Key Stage 1, pupils should have the opportunity to learn: 1. what positively and negatively affects their physical, mental and emotional health (including the media) 2. how to make informed choices (including recognising that choices can have positive, neutral and negative consequences) and to begin to understand the concept of a ‘balanced lifestyle’ 3. to recognise opportunities to make their own choices about food, what might influence their choices and the benefits of eating a balanced diet 4. to recognise how images in the media do not always reflect reality and can affect how people feel about themselves 5. to reflect on and celebrate their achievements, identify

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What is the difference between Physical Activity, Sport & PE?

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Physical Activity Physical activity is defined as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure WHO

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Physical Education Physical Education is planned, progressive learning that takes place in school curriculum timetabled time and which is delivered to all pupils. This involves both “learning to move” (i.e. becoming more physically competent) and “moving to learn” (learning through movement, a range of skills and understandings beyond the physical activity, such as co-operating with others). The context for learning is physical activity, with children experiencing a broad range of activities, including sport and dance.

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Sport An activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment. or a contest or game in which people do certain physical activities according to a specific set of rules and compete against each other

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Children and young people aged 5 to 18 Children and young people aged 5 to 18 should do at least 60 minutes (one hour) of aerobic activity every day. This should include a mix of: moderate-intensity activities: this means your child is working hard enough to raise their heart rate and break a sweat vigorous-intensity activities: this means they’re breathing hard and fast, and their heart rate has gone up quite a bit

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Moderate-intensity activity means you’re working hard enough to raise your heart rate and break a sweat. One way to tell if you’re working at a moderate intensity is if you can still talk but you can’t sing the words to a song.

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Examples of activities that require moderate effort for most young people include: walking to school playing in the playground riding a scooter skateboarding rollerblading walking the dog Cycling on level ground

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Vigorous-intensity activity means you’re breathing hard and fast, and your heart rate has gone up quite a bit. If you’re working at this level, you won’t be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath.

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What counts as vigorous-intensity activity? Vigorous-intensity activity is associated with better general health, stronger bones and muscles as well as higher levels of self-esteem. Examples of activities that require vigorous effort for most young people include: playing chase Energetic dancing Swimming gymnastics Football running rugby martial arts, such as karate Cycling fast or on a hilly terrain

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Did you know? 1 in 4 children believe playing computer games is a form of exercise! Youth Sport Trust, 2015

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How much Energy do you use? worksheet

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Higher or lower

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Hiking 370 Kcals

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Dancing Higher or lower than hiking? (370kcal)

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Dancing 330 Kcal

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Aerobics Higher or lower than Dancing? (330kcal)

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Aerobics 480 Kcal

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Golf (walking and carrying clubs) Higher or lower than Aerobics (480kcal)

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Golf 330 Kcal

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Weight training (general light workout) Higher or lower than Golf (330kcal)

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Weight training 220 Kcal

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Running/ jogging (5 mph) Higher or lower than weight training (220kcal)

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running / jogging 590 Kcal

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Swimming (slow freestyle laps) Higher or lower than running / jogging (590kcal)

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Swimming 510 Kcal

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Light gardening / yard work Higher or lower than swimming (510kcal)

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Light gardening 330 Kcal

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Bicycling (less than 10 mph) Higher or lower than light gardening (330kcal)

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Bicycling 290Kcal

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Heavy yard work (chopping wood) Higher or lower than bicycling (290kcal)

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Heavy yard work 440 Kcal

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Walking (3.5 mph) Higher or lower than heavy yard work? (440kcal)

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Walking 280Kcal

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Bicycling (more than 10 mph) Higher or lower than walking (280kcal)

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Bicycling (+10mph) 590 Kcal

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Stretching Higher or lower than bicycling (590kcal)

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Stretching 180Kcal

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Basketball (vigorous) Higher or lower than stretching (180kcal)

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Basketball 440 Kcal

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End

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Four aspects of fitness Strength – The maximum amount of force a muscle, or a group of muscles can exert in a single effort. Speed – is the ability to cover a distance or perform a movement in a short time Suppleness – is the range of movement across a joint Stamina – It is the ability to perform a skill or take part in activity for a long period of time worksheet

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Recovery

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Eat well Plate http://www.grainchain.com/Fun_and_games/healthy/11-14_FoodOnAPlate.html

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Activity Line up

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Energy Input – Expenditure http://www.foodafactoflife.org.uk/Activity.aspx? siteId=15&sectionId=64&contentId=214

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Christopher Price Healthy Lifestyle Officer [email protected]


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