Unit 3: Life skills required to adapt to change as part of healthy lifestyle choices: initiate, build and sustain positive relationships and importance.

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Presentation on theme: “Unit 3: Life skills required to adapt to change as part of healthy lifestyle choices: initiate, build and sustain positive relationships and importance.”— Presentation transcript:

1

Unit 3: Life skills required to adapt to change as part of healthy lifestyle choices: initiate, build and sustain positive relationships and importance of communication pg 19-25

2

3.1. Initiate, build and sustain positive relationships and importance of communication
KEYWORDS: Sustain : keep going, maintain, continue Initiate : start, begin Empathy : understand another person’s feelings

3

3.1. Initiate, build and sustain positive relationships and importance of communication
Important to know how to keep relationships positive Communication is about understanding others and communicating feelings, beliefs and attitudes These are VITAL SKILLS as you meet new people when you leave school

4

5

3.1. … How to make friends, build relationships and keep your friends
Initiate relationships Initiate talking to people Remember names of people Be willing to share a little of yourself (not ALL the time) Humour (avoid dirty jokes) Keep up to date with latest news/topics people are discussing

6

7

3.1. … How to make friends, build relationships and keep your friends…..
2. Build and sustain relationships: communicate that you understand others by showing empathy Empathy – you can relate to what they are saying, feeling, and go through Developing positive relationships is based on being able to understand others Core of a relationship is to show you understand – you do this by listening, hearing and trying to feel what it is like to be the other person

8

Showing empathy (useful ways)
I know what you mean …. I feel for you ….. I am with you in this …. Almost the same thing happened to me, so I understand …. No matter what, I am here for you ….

9

3.1. … How to make friends, build relationships and keep your friends…..
3. Build and sustain relationships: show that you understand others by applying listening skills Hear what is being said. Be an active listener. How? Let the speaker finish before you talk. Reword and repeat what was said and give a response Show you are interested by asking questions. Use your body language to show that you are listening. How? Avoid gossiping/sharing information that was shared in confidence. Trust and Understanding go together.

10

11

3.1. … How to make friends, build relationships and keep your friends…..
4. Build and sustain relationships: communicate your feelings, beliefs and attitudes Express your feelings, beliefs and attitudes, BUT avoid imposing/forcing them on others. When you express your feelings, be specific. How?

12

3.2. Factors that influence effective communication
1. Personality ( see pg 23). 2. Attitudes and values 3. Acceptance of responsibilities 4. Appropriate expression of views and feelings 5. Respect the feelings of others

13

To show that you respect the feelings of others:
Listen carefully, pay attention and look interested and engaged Use positive body language and don’t look bored Never interrupt Respond with statements such as: I agree with what you are saying; I understand how you feel Avoid judging people without first listening to them Avoid laughing at or teasing people when they share their feelings with you


7 Must-Know Benefits of a Healthy Lifestyle – Healthy Henry County

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Get this. Only 12% of American adults are metabolically healthy. Only 12%!

Metabolic health is your body’s ability to maintain ideal levels of blood sugar, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, blood pressure, and waist circumference. All of these statistics help measure your overall health. The better these numbers, the better your overall health.

If so few people are healthy, it must not be worthwhile to put in the effort to get there, right? Otherwise, everyone would be doing it!

Not so. There are a lot of benefits of a healthy lifestyle, and learning to add healthy habits doesn’t have to be hard.

Here are the top things you can do to live a healthier lifestyle, how they benefit you, and steps you can take today to implement them.

1. Eat Healthy Foods

This is not new information, but it’s still the core of creating a healthy lifestyle. Without proper nutrition, almost nothing else you do will matter. Fueling your body with clean energy is the key to building a healthy lifestyle.

What You Can Do Today

You can’t change your diet overnight. But you can make healthier choices. Start by getting rid of junk food, or at the very least hiding it out of sight or somewhere hard to get to.

Put healthy foods like fruits and vegetables in easy to reach places, so you’re more likely to snack on them instead. Spend some time each week prepping veggies, so they’re easy to add to a dish, or easy to munch on.

Each week, try a new healthy recipe and find fresh foods you love. Changing your diet takes time, but every time you make a healthy choice, you’re setting yourself up for a better life.

Benefits of Eating Well

Eating healthy helps you maintain a proper weight, which is key to preventing most of the most common causes of death. But it also improves your memory, gives you better energy, and can clear up bad skin and even headaches.

2. Move Every Day

This isn’t a surprise, either. You know you need to exercise more. So what’s holding you back?

But here’s the cool thing. You don’t need to hit the gym to get the benefits of exercising more. The healthiest people incorporate movement into their daily lifestyle, not just at the gym.

What You Can Do Today

Start just by moving more. Set a reminder on your phone to stand up every hour for three minutes or so. Take a walk during lunch—Park at the back of the parking lot. Always take the stairs.

But you should also find a form of movement you love. While lifting weights and cardio are essential, exercise shouldn’t feel like a chore. If you enjoy rock climbing, yoga, soccer, dance, or any other thing that gets you moving, pursue that!

Benefits of Moving More

Better sleep, more energy, improved muscle tone, become more physically capable and live your life to the fullest. You’ll also be better looking, you’ll be more active for longer, and you’ll feel better about yourself. Regular exercise can even relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety.

3. Set a Regular Sleep Schedule

Sleep is a fundamental core to maintaining proper health. In a perfect world, you’d get up and sleep with the sun cycle. Even if that’s not realistic for your lifestyle, you should still set a regular bedtime and wake up time you follow every day.

What You Can Do Today

Highlight problems that keep you from getting good sleep. Upgrade your mattress or linens if you’re not comfortable, or buy blackout curtains if light keeps you awake. Set white noise or pink noise to help you sleep better.

Set up a night routine that can help your mind rest. Include things like journal or setting up a diffuser with a lavender scent to help your brain fall asleep.

It’s also smart to stop using technology an hour before bed, and stop eating three hours before bed.

Benefits of Proper Sleep

A regular sleep cycle can help you wake up with more energy and improve your focus throughout the day. It also improves your memory and fights inflammation in your body to keep you healthier. It can even help you lose weight.

4. Drink Plenty of Water

If you’re drinking your calories, you’re doing it wrong. Water should be the primary beverage you drink, and all (or at least most) of your calories should come from real food.

What You Can Do Today

Get a water bottle you like and start carrying it with you everywhere. If you hate the taste of water, get an infuser and add cucumbers, mint, strawberries, or lemon so you can enjoy it more.

Often just having water nearby will help you drink more. You can also set triggers throughout your day to remind you to drink, like immediately after getting up, or before a mealtime.

Benefits of Staying Hydrated

Staying hydrated helps you keep clear skin. It lubricates your joints and airways and supports your brain. You can feel more alert and consume fewer calories throughout the day. But it also helps to flush out waste in your body and maintain your blood pressure.

5. Manage Stress in Your Life

A small amount of stress or stress in short bursts is perfect for you. Long-term stress can wreak havoc. It contributes to ulcers, depression, anxiety, headaches, high blood pressure, and diabetes.

So learning to manage stress is essential to keep a healthy lifestyle.

What You Can Do Today

Meditating and journal are often the two best DIY ways to manage stress. But it’s also a good idea to find someone you can confide, whether it’s a close friend or family member or a therapist.

It’s also a good idea to create space in your life to relax and have fun. Consider yoga, painting, or hiking, or anything that helps you relax.

Benefits of Lowering Stress

Lowering stress helps fight inflammation, headaches, depression, and anxiety. It can make it easier to maintain a healthy weight and other healthy lifestyle habits too.

6. Build a Strong Social Circle

Taking care of your body isn’t enough to live a healthy lifestyle. You also need to nourish your soul, and the best way to do that is by building a strong social circle.

What You Can Do Today

Spend time with your friends, family, and community. Reconnect with someone you haven’t spoken with in a long time, or join a new group or club. Try to set up a regular coffee date or brunch time with friends, and get to know your neighbors.

Benefits of Close Friends

Having people in your life, you can rely on helps fight depression and loneliness. These people can support you through dark times and encourage you to live your best life.

7. Don’t Skip Doctors Appointments

Make sure you visit the doctor and dentists as often as recommended. Early detection is the key to treating most terminal diseases, and these diseases can’t be detected early if you never visit the doctor.

What You Can Do Today

Make sure you have a doctor’s appointment scheduled in the future. Visit the dentist, doctor, and eye doctor regularly. If you haven’t in a while, schedule an appointment today.

Benefits of Seeing the Doctor

While the initial trip (and following bill) isn’t fun, regular doctor visits are the key to detecting diseases before they become a problem.

What You Can Do Today

Start learning about the most common chemicals in cleaning and personal products, and learn to spot them in your products. Then replace them with safer alternatives. Visit a high-quality hair store or your local health food store for more reliable options.

The Benefits of a Healthy Lifestyle Outweigh the Work to Get There

There are a lot of benefits of a healthy lifestyle. While it does take work to get there, the fundamentals are easy to understand and implement. The pros outweigh the effort it takes to establish healthy habits.

So follow these tips for living a healthy life, and enjoy living your best life.

Healthy Lifestyle Tips: 8 of This, 8 of That

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

At 8fit, we believe that most good things come in eights! So, we are very excited to share eight of our top healthy lifestyle tips that you can easily implement into your day-to-day life starting now.

Did you ever notice that the number eight shares a striking resemblance to the infinity symbol? Here at 8fit, we’re all about helping you create healthy habits that last not a week, not a month, but a lifetime. Like the infinity symbol suggests, the work doesn’t stop once you reach a goal or a certain benchmark. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle takes work. Sure, it gets easier, but different temptations and distractions will also come about. Perseverance and consistency pay off and keep you from spiraling back into old, unhealthy habits.

8 Healthy lifestyle tips

When you’re just starting out, start small. Focus on one thing at a time, for example, spending two weeks focused on drinking more water and less soda or juice. Then, after mastering that healthy habit, move onto the next (like adding two or three HIIT workouts per week). Below, find eight realistic tips and a pretty graphic that makes the perfect desktop background or refrigerator ornament.

daily reminders for healthy living

8 glasses of water per day

Water is the best way to stay hydrated and hydration is important because, well, our bodies are made up of a whole lot of water. It’s also a calorie-free beverage that can be enhanced with fresh fruits and herbs. How much water is enough? According to the World Health Organization, the minimum water requirement for a 70 kg human (154 pounds) is three liters (100 ounces) per day. But, to keep things simple, we suggest aiming for eight, 12-ounce glasses of water per day (96 ounces).

8,000 steps

Walking regularly does wonders for our blood circulation, airways, joints, guts, and our mind. To reach a minimum of 8,000 steps per day, try to walk while doing your everyday activities like going to work, visiting the store, meeting your friends, and commuting to a workout class. If it’s not possible for you to walk, park further away or get off the bus one stop early. Walking is also a great way to explore your neighborhood and the parks around you.

8 servings of fruits and vegetables

Fruits and vegetables are packed with good stuff like healthy carbs, fiber, and nutrients too. Current evidence indicates that the regular consumption of fruits and vegetables has potential health benefits like preventing obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and various cancers. The guidelines for how many fruits and how many vegetables you should eat per day are all over the place. We recommend a grand total of eight, favoring more veggies over fruits since many tasty fruits are high in sugar.

veggies and fruits

8 minutes HIIT

Are you surprised HIIT made it on our list?! The 8fit fitness program is centered around quick, effective HIIT workouts because we believe that everyone has time for HIIT. Stop, drop and do at least eight minutes of intense physical activity per day. But, remember, because we only suggest you do HIIT about four times per week, mix it up and add in power walks, jogs, Zumba, yoga — whathaveyou.

8 stretches

What’s the best thing to do after a HIIT? Stretch it out! We suggest starting every workout session with a warm-up and ending with a proper stretch. Stretching is also a great healthy lifestyle habit to work into your morning routine and during the workday. Taking time to stretch helps improve and maintain correct posture and decreases the prevalence of chronic pain like that pesky low-back pain.

8 belly laughs

This one is important. Laughing out loud is a great way to boost your mood and get a quick core workout even if you’re forcing yourself to laugh. That chuckle releases feel-good brain chemicals which can also relieve pain.

8 minutes meditation

Recent studies show that both mindfulness and self-compassion skills might contribute to a healthy well-being and more positive emotions. Even short meditation sessions can improve our thoughts and shift our perspective. Like most things, a little bit is better than nothing. Maybe start by taking 5 minutes in the morning and a few minutes midday to breathe in a tall, seated posture.

8 hours of sleep

Science suggests that a healthy adult should sleep for seven to nine hours per night, so eight hours on average. Regular sleeping patterns are associated with improved memory, alertness, and physical performance.

To help make some of these habits stick, sign up for 8fit and use it as your guide. You’ll be able to put some of our healthy lifestyle tips to practice right away. And, to keep these habits top-of-mind even at work, save the graphic below as your desktop wallpaper.

Diabetes prevention: 5 tips for taking control

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Diabetes prevention: 5 tips for taking control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it’s never too late to start. Consider these tips.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is very important. It’s especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you’re at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you’re overweight or you have a family history of the disease or you have been diagnosed with prediabetes (also known as impaired fasting glucose).

Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It’s never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes in the future, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider these diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association.

1. Get more physical activity

There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you:

  • Lose weight
  • Lower your blood sugar
  • Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range

Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both.

2. Get plenty of fiber

Fiber may help you:

  • Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control
  • Lower your risk of heart disease
  • Promote weight loss by helping you feel full

Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts.

3. Go for whole grains

It’s not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains.

Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look for the word “whole” on the package and among the first few items in the ingredient list.

4. Lose extra weight

If you’re overweight, diabetes prevention may hinge on weight loss. Every pound you lose can improve your health, and you may be surprised by how much. Participants in one large study who lost a modest amount of weight — around 7 percent of initial body weight — and exercised regularly reduced the risk of developing diabetes by almost 60 percent.

5. Skip fad diets and just make healthier choices

Low-carb diets, the glycemic index diet or other fad diets may help you lose weight at first. But their effectiveness at preventing diabetes and their long-term effects aren’t known. And by excluding or strictly limiting a particular food group, you may be giving up essential nutrients and often craving such foods. Instead, make variety and portion control part of your healthy-eating plan.

When to see your doctor

The American Diabetes Association recommends blood glucose screening if:

  • You’re age 45 or older
  • You’re an overweight adult of any age, with one or more additional risk factors for diabetes, such as a family history of diabetes, a personal history of prediabetes or an inactive lifestyle

After age 45, your doctor will likely recommend screening every three years.

Share your concerns about diabetes prevention with your doctor. He or she will appreciate your efforts to prevent diabetes and may offer additional suggestions based on your medical history or other factors.

.

40 Healthy Lifestyle Habits Meghan Markle Swears By

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

41/41 SLIDES

Healthy eating habits teens | Raising Children Network

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Eating and eating habits in teenagers

As children begin puberty, they often feel hungrier and eat more. That’s because their bodies go through a major growth spurt in the teenage years. Extra food gives your child extra energy and nutrients to support this growth and development.

Your child might also start changing their eating habits. For example, it’s common for teenagers to start eating fewer fruit and vegies and more fatty and sugary foods. This might be because your child’s friends are into convenience or junk foods, because they have their own money to spend on food, or because they want to explore their own values about eating.

When teenagers eat a wide range of foods from the five food groups, they get the nutrition they need for health, growth and development.

How to encourage healthy eating habits in teenagers

As your teenage child gains independence and makes more of their own food choices, you can encourage healthy habits by:

  • being a healthy eating role model
  • creating a healthy food environment at home
  • talking about healthy eating in positive ways.

Role-modelling
Being a positive food role model is one of the best ways to encourage your child’s healthy eating habits.

This is about showing your child that healthy eating is important to you. There are many ways you can do this – for example, by always eating breakfast and by choosing healthy food options when you’re eating away from home or food shopping.

Making time to enjoy healthy meals as a family is one of the best ways to model healthy habits and increase your child’s interest in healthy food and nutrition. It’s also a good way to spend family time together catching up on everyone’s day.

Creating a healthy food environment
If you have a healthy food environment in your family, it makes it easier for your child to make better choices.

Here are some practical ways you can create a healthy food environment:

  • Ask your child to help with your family’s food shopping and meal planning.
  • Encourage your child to take responsibility for planning and preparing one healthy family meal a week.
  • Limit unhealthy food options in your home, and make it easy for your child to find healthy food at home. For example, keep a bowl of fruit on the bench, a container of chopped vegies in the fridge, wholegrain bread in the freezer, and wholegrain crackers in the cupboard.

If your child starts learning to cook some simple healthy meals now, it sets them up to make better food choices in the future. Also, if your child feels they have some say about what’s on the menu, they’re more likely to eat it.

Talking about food
The way you talk about food has a big effect on your child’s eating habits. Try to emphasise all of the good things about healthy eating, instead of focusing on the effects of unhealthy eating.

These ideas might help:

  • Avoid restricting foods or describing them as ‘good’, ‘bad’, ‘naughty’ and so on. Instead, aim for balance – eat healthy most of the time, and every now and then you might like to eat ‘sometimes’ foods.
  • Teach your child to eat when they’re hungry and to stop when they’re full. This helps your child learn to recognise whether they’re eating out of true hunger or eating out of boredom or tiredness. But you can expect your child to eat a lot more while they’re growing and developing.
  • Talk with your child about how food can help with concentration, school, sports performance and wellbeing. This can motivate your child to make healthy choices, and it’ll probably mean more to your child than information about longer-term health risks.
  • Talk about your enjoyment and interest in the healthy food you’re eating. This can encourage your child to enjoy eating healthy food too.

Risks of unhealthy eating habits in teenagers

Unhealthy eating habits like eating too much, not eating enough, or restricted eating can be bad for your teenage child’s health and wellbeing, now and in the future. But with healthy eating habits in adolescence, your child can mostly avoid these risks.

Eating too much
Eating too much food, particularly unhealthy food, puts your child at risk of overweight and obesity.

An overweight or obese child is at an increased risk of type-2 diabetes, sleep apnoea and hip and joint problems. Long-term risks include heart disease and some cancers.

Not eating enough
When teenagers go on fad or crash diets they can be at risk of not eating enough and not getting the nutrients they need for healthy growth and development.

Severe dieting can lead to health and other problems like fatigue, poor concentration and loss of muscle mass and bone density.

Some children develop eating disorders like anorexia, bulimia and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. Some signs and symptoms of an eating disorder include constant or repetitive dieting, binge eating, excessive exercise, food avoidance, repeated weighing and dizziness. If you’re worried that your child might be at risk of eating disorders, see your GP or another health professional as soon as possible.

Restricted eating
Your child doesn’t need to restrict foods like dairy foods or foods with gluten unless they have a food allergy or food intolerance that has been diagnosed by a health professional.

If your child is eating a restricted diet that isn’t well-planned and/or supervised by a GP or dietitian, it could lead to nutritional deficiencies and other health problems.

For example, a dairy-free diet over an extended period of time might mean your child isn’t getting enough calcium, vitamin D, energy and protein for bone health and peak bone mass.

A poorly planned long-term vegetarian diet can result in your child not getting enough nutrients, especially iron and vitamin B12. This is a particular risk for girls who have started having periods. Both factors increase the risk of iron deficiency and anaemia.

If you need some help with your child’s nutrition or you’re concerned about your child’s eating habits and health, you could start by making an appointment with your family GP. Another option is to see an Accredited Practising Dietitian in your area.

Development and psychometric evaluation of the healthy lifestyle questionnaire for elderly (heal) | Health and Quality of Life Outcomes

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, improved living conditions and life expectancy have resulted in an increase in the population of older adults worldwide. For instance, it has been reported that between 2015 and 2030 the older population in lower-middle income countries will increase by 66% and that in low-income countries will grow up by 63% [1]. However, as far as it relates to Iran, the official statistics indicates that the population of older adults is increasing steadily. At present about 10% of the population of Iran are aged 60 and over [2, 3].

Owing to the accelerated phenomenon of population aging in Iran as in other countries, demographic conditions are changing and moving toward aging and its resultant consequences [4]. These changes will most likely lead to important economic, health, and social challenges, and a growing prevalence of chronic conditions will increase the need for health improvement interventions by healthcare providers as well as family members and communities. It must be noted that modification and improvement of lifestyle are important prerequisites for maintaining good health [5] Given the growth in chronic conditions and, based on the health promotion approaches, people must be empowered to accept responsibility for their own health and adopt a healthy lifestyle [6].

A healthy lifestyle with the multidimensional nature is crucial, as it can influence the quality of life, illness management, and prevent diseases [7]. A healthy lifestyle means having a balanced life in which an individual consciously makes healthy choices and takes special measures such as following a healthy diet, striking a balance among sleep, activity, and exercise, controlling weight and stress, abstaining from smoking and consuming alcohol, and getting oneself immunized against diseases [8]. However, though lifestyle is formed by personal choices and identities, it cannot be analyzed in isolation of its social and cultural contexts. It means the personal, biological and psychological characteristics of the individual, family, friends, and social community affect the individual’s daily life and lifestyle [9].

As there seems to be a triangular relationship between aging, chronic conditions, and healthy life style, the assessment of attitudes and behaviors of the elderly toward a certain lifestyle can offer information to healthcare providers to evaluate elders’ way of living and accurately design appropriate preventive interventions, enhance the capabilities of the elderly, and modify their lifestyle in an acceptable manner if necessary.

Assessment of the lifestyle of older people requires accurate tools for measuring health-related behaviors. Although there are numerous instruments for the measurement of lifestyle in Western communities, differences in social and cultural contexts, especially the ethnic backgrounds [9] and educational levels of older adults [10], might cause some limitations to their use in other communities such as Iran, where more than two-thirds of the elderly people are either illiterate or less educated [11]. Additionally some existing instruments only measure special lifestyle aspects for example, stress management, nutrition or exercise and do not have comprehensive approach to measuring healthy lifestyles.

Among existing instruments, the Health Enhancement Lifestyle Profile (HELP II), as a common multidimensional tool, has been applied in most lifestyle studies [12, 13]. The Iranian version of this questionnaire has been developed and mainly is used for young people [5, 8, 14,15,16,17].

Considering the limitations of using the existing tools in older adults, Eshaghi et al., in 2010, designed a Healthy Lifestyle Assessment Questionnaire for Iranian older adults. This questionnaire was designed based on a review of available tools, relevant texts, and interviews with Iranian elderly population. It includes 46 Likert type questions, which are designed to assess physical activity, sport and recreation, healthy eating, stress management, and social and interpersonal relationships in older adults [18]. This questionnaire is long and the response categories are very diverse and sometimes could be difficult to understand and respond to its items by elders.

According to Haywood et al., despite the presence of numerous instruments, it still is necessary to design and develop appropriate specific tools for screening and monitoring the health status and lifestyle of the elderly population. They argue that such tools must be simple, comprehensible, and easily applicable especially in clinical settings. In addition, as they should be more acceptable for and focused on the status of the elderly, they should be able to monitor and evaluate the changes in the elderly health status more precisely [18]. Spencer et al. believe that the evaluation of the health status of the elderly by the use of short questions and without clinical computation will facilitate the assessment of their health status and provide more valid and reliable data not only for healthcare providers but also for researchers [19].

Indeed, the nature of the aging process, some abilities, such as the loss of hearing, vision, concentration, and memory decline in older adults, can lead to problems in effective communication. Such problems make it difficult to use instruments with long and unclear statements for questioning older people. Given the lack of an appropriate tool to study the healthy lifestyle of the elderly population, it seems necessary to design instruments of acceptable validity and reliability that would be consistent with norms and social contexts, and be simple and easily applicable, especially to illiterate elders. Accordingly, the present study was designed to develop a questionnaire to study healthy lifestyles among older adults and evaluate its validity and reliability.

Living a healthy lifestyle including a nutritious diet is the key to wellness

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

joseph elijah barrettBuild a toned
midsection with these exercises
If you want rock-hard abs like these, you have to melt
away that body fat
. But exercise is needed to tone and build abdominal muscles. The armor plating you see at left is the result of
the stripping away of excess body fat and an intense abdominal workout. My workout included some weights because I wanted to enlarge the
muscles. But if you don’t want to build up these muscles, skip the weights.
More…

Living a healthy lifestyle news bulletin.
Public health officials in New York state and several other states want to tax
obesity-promoting sugary beverages as a means of fighting this escalating problem. What are your thoughts
of this tax to fight obesity?
Weigh in here.

Frankenfood-The Truth
About Genetically Modified Food
. Untested and potentially dangerous genetically modified ingredients
are so prevalent in the United States that you have a 75 percent chance of buying a product that contains them
every time you go shopping at your favorite supermarket.
More…

Must read-A humorous look at America’s love affair with junk food–contrary to living
a healthy lifestyle.
The author of this hilarious piece is
unknown
.

lift weights 
intelligentlyHow to Lift Weights Intelligently

I don’t want to make it sound as if weight training is complicated – that you have to be a rocket scientist in order
to do it right. But on the other hand I don’t wish to paint a picture of ‘tip-toeing through the tulips’ with careless
abandon either.

There is a right way and a wrong way to do anything. That includes lifting weights. And
although it isn’t difficult, doing it the wrong way can lead to injury (which is counterproductive to your goal.)

This eBook is yours free. 22 pages.
Download your copy here.

beat cancer Beating
Cancer

Cancer statistics are frightening. It hits one out of every two men in the United States and one out of
every three women.

Cancer is the leading cause of death in children between the ages of one and
fourteen years old. Every year 1.2 million Americans develop cancer, and a new cancer is diagnosed
every 30 seconds. 98 pages.

Get your free copy (eBOOK) here
.


Please subscribe to my Living A Healthy Lifestyle mini blog. It will provide you with any new articles and
any existing article which has been updated. Living-A-Healthy-Lifestyle.com is constantly being updated to better
serve you. Just ‘click’ the link below.


What is an RSS feed?




Promote living a healthy lifestyle website on your web page. Link to this page by copying and pasting the
following code. It will be a live link to this Home Page.


What People Are Saying…

I just wanted to thank you for this site. You provide great info and I will be back to tell my story. I have learned even more that I did not know. I weigh 340 pounds and am a former College Offensive line man. I currently am a football coach. I have the drive and work ethic to bring it down. With the info I have gathered here today, I am better equipped to do so. Thanks. Nevin, KS

Wow. I really learned a lot on your prevent cancer link and aspartame. I have long warned friends about that and your article is very convincing. Marilyn, CT

I just want to say how your web site is excellent!!! I found it very informative…Good work!… Dennis, Australia

Hi…I want to first thank you for the information you have provided here on your page. I was researching the dangers of infant formula due to its content of High Fructose Corn Syrup. which I am in the process of eliminating… Christy, TN

Hi health guy…thanks for your blog! Rebecca, NY

Cool site. Rob, MA

Good website. Chris, South Australia

I came across www.living-a-healthy-lifestyle.com in the search engines. Great job! I have signed up to your newsletter and can’t wait to receive your great information…Really interesting site you have with unique angles on topics within the health and weight loss area. Adrian, East Essex, United Kingdom

I ran upon your Twitter post on taking L-Arginine in replace of pharmaceuticals and couldn’t agree more…Also, I love your site. I try to eat a handful of almonds a day too. Very true and educational. Angela, VA

…I am emailing you to thank you for the best health website I have ever visited! I have tweeted and Facebook-posted about your unbelievably inclusive
and informative website! Thanks a zillion
! Pamela P, [email protected]

Was the information on this site helpful? If so please share it with family and friends:

Strengthen your lower back by playing “Superman”

As I was flipping through the pages of Muscle & Performance magazine, I came upon an exercise movement that targets the lower back.

I happen to have a bad lower back which I need to keep strong. To strengthen it I perform hyperextensions. For that I use a sit-up chair
at the gym I attend.

But what if you were on vacation, or didn’t have access to that special chair? Well this movement which I will describe fills in
nicely.

This lower back exercise is called the “superman.” Lie flat on your stomach with your arms outstretched above your head and palms on the
floor. Now lift your arms and upper body while at the same time lifting your legs. (Don’t bend the knees.)

Return to the starting position and repeat. The movement is small but extremely effective.

Living A Healthy Lifestyle. &copy 2007 – 2013. All rights reserved.
Webmaster: Joseph Elijah Barrett

Special SiteSell Promotion

Disclaimer |
About
|
Advertise With Living a Healthy Lifestyle
|
Healthy Eating Plan | FAQs |

Calories to Maintain Weight | Topics by Index
|
Mission Statement | Questions From
Our Visitors
| Back Issues |
Comments From Our Visitors |

Saturated Fat and Cholesterol Do Not Lead to Heart Disease
|
Medicated America

Unhealthy lifestyle only explains a small part of socioeconomic health inequity

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

A recent study on UK and US adults states that unhealthy lifestyles alone only explain a small proportion of the socioeconomic inequity in health.

This is the suggestion of a large study published in the BMJ.

The findings show that the poorest individuals with the least healthy lifestyle are 2.7 to 3.5 times more at risk of death than the most affluent people with the healthiest lifestyle.

While healthy lifestyles play an important role in reducing disease burden, the researchers warn that healthy lifestyle promotion alone “might not substantially reduce the socioeconomic inequity in health, and other measures tackling social determinants of health are warranted.”

It is well known that disadvantaged socioeconomic status (the measure of a person’s social and economic standing) and unhealthy lifestyles are linked to poor health.

Lifestyle factors are commonly viewed as mediators between socioeconomic status and health, but it’s not clear to what extent healthy lifestyles might alleviate the socioeconomic inequities in health.

To explore this further, an international research team used data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (US NHANES) and UK Biobank to evaluate the complex relations of lifestyles and socioeconomic status with death and heart disease.

Their findings are based on 44,462 US adults aged 20 years or older and 399,537 UK adults aged 37-73 years.

Socioeconomic status was defined using family income, occupation or employment status, and education level in both groups, and health insurance in US participants. A healthy lifestyle score was derived using the information on smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity and diet.

Medical records were then used to track deaths from any cause (“all-cause mortality”) among both US and UK adults, as well as cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD deaths in UK adults.

Over an average follow-up of 9-11 years, US NHANES documented 8,906 deaths and UK Biobank documented 22,309 deaths and 6,903 CVD cases.

Among adults of low socioeconomic status, the age-adjusted risk of death was 22.5 and 7.4 per 1000 person-years in US NHANES and UK Biobank, respectively, and the age-adjusted risk of CVD was 2.5 per 1000 person-years in UK Biobank.

The corresponding risks among adults of high socioeconomic status were 11.4, 3.3, and 1.4 per 1000 person-years.

Compared with adults of high socioeconomic status, those of low socioeconomic status had consistently higher risks of mortality and CVD, and lifestyle factors only explained 3 per cent to 12 per cent of the excess risks. The highest risks of mortality and CVD were seen in adults of low socioeconomic status and with the least healthy lifestyles.

For example, compared with adults of high socioeconomic status and three or four healthy lifestyle factors, those with low socioeconomic status and no or one healthy lifestyle factor had 2.09-fold to 3.53-fold higher risks of mortality and CVD.

This is an observational study, so can’t establish cause, and information on the socioeconomic level and lifestyle was self-reported, so may not have been completely accurate. Nevertheless, strengths included the large sample size from two well established nationwide databases, and results were similar after further analyses, suggesting they are robust.

Unhealthy lifestyles mediated a small proportion of the socioeconomic inequity in health in both US and UK adults; therefore, healthy lifestyle promotion, although essential, alone might not substantially reduce the socioeconomic inequity in health, and other measures tackling social determinants of health are warranted, say the researchers.

They call for government policies “to tackle upstream social and environmental determinants of health” but also point out that healthy lifestyles were associated with lower mortality and CVD risk in different socioeconomic groups, “supporting an important role of healthy lifestyles in reducing disease burden.”

Follow more stories on Facebook and Twitter

This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.

Top 10 Health Magazines – Health, Psychology Today, Men’s Health, Women’s Health and more

admin
Posted in Healthy lifestyle

Subscribe to Health

Health is a fitness magazine that is appropriate for all readers. Anything having to do with leading a strong, productive life is contained within, including diet advice, workouts, and informative articles.

Subscribe to Psychology Today

The primary publication on the human mind, Psychology Today features up to date research, trends, findings, and tons of other information involving the ways we think and behave.

Subscribe to Men's Health

The world’s top men’s fitness magazine, Men’s Health is the definitive authority on news, trends, and techniques associated with life as a healthy man. Food, fashion, and fitness are among the men-centric topics discussed here.

Subscribe to Women's Health

A women’s magazine that speaks to the modern, practical woman, Women’s Health prides itself on covering the fitness concerns that affect today’s smart, independent women.

Subscribe to Runner's World

For all your running needs, Runner’s World will have the info to help. Product reviews, techniques, events, and numerous other running-related topics are covered in this magazine.

Subscribe to Shape

A magazine for the overall well-being of women, Shape is not only about staying fit. Topics include healthy eating, celebrities, and fashion. They also feature contests and weight-loss challenges to get you motivated.

Subscribe to Life Extension

Fighting issues related to aging is a challenge that faces everyone, and Life Extension magazine will discuss the issues, news, and innovations that may extend your life.

Subscribe to ADDitude

With AD/HD a nationally-recognized disease, ADDitude is the guide to all new advancements, notable people, treatments, and information regarding attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity disorder.

Subscribe to Prevention

Subscribe to Mind, Mood & Memory

Subscribe to ADDitude

With AD/HD a nationally-recognized disease, ADDitude is the guide to all new advancements, notable people, treatments, and information regarding attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity disorder.

Subscribe to Bottom Line/Health

Focusing on cutting-edge treatments and medicines, Bottom Line/ Health is a magazine that is dedicated to informing you about the newest health and treatment trends.

Subscribe to Consumer Reports on Health

Subscribe to DIVERSEability

Subscribe to Experience Life

A no gimmicks magazine, Experience Life shares tips on healthy eating, how to move, detox and heal your body.

Subscribe to Health

Health is a fitness magazine that is appropriate for all readers. Anything having to do with leading a strong, productive life is contained within, including diet advice, workouts, and informative articles.

Subscribe to Herb Quarterly

Herbs are used throughout the world as remedies and treatments, and The Herb Quarterly is the publication that supports the herb-loving lifestyle, with detailed explanations, pictures, and much more.

Subscribe to Life Extension

Fighting issues related to aging is a challenge that faces everyone, and Life Extension magazine will discuss the issues, news, and innovations that may extend your life.

Subscribe to Men's Health

The world’s top men’s fitness magazine, Men’s Health is the definitive authority on news, trends, and techniques associated with life as a healthy man. Food, fashion, and fitness are among the men-centric topics discussed here.

Subscribe to Men's Health Advisor

Subscribe to Mind, Mood & Memory

Subscribe to Prevention

Subscribe to Runner's World

For all your running needs, Runner’s World will have the info to help. Product reviews, techniques, events, and numerous other running-related topics are covered in this magazine.

Subscribe to Spirituality & Health

For a magazine that combines fitness advice and trends with an emphasis on religion and spirituality, check out Spirituality & Health.

Subscribe to Women

Subscribe to Women's Health

A women’s magazine that speaks to the modern, practical woman, Women’s Health prides itself on covering the fitness concerns that affect today’s smart, independent women.

Subscribe to Women's Health Advisor

Subscribe to Women's Nutrition Connection

Subscribe to Pilates Style

The only exercise you truly need. Pilates style gives you the exercises along with the rationales. Get fit, stay strong.

Subscribe to Psychology Today

The primary publication on the human mind, Psychology Today features up to date research, trends, findings, and tons of other information involving the ways we think and behave.

Subscribe to Shape

A magazine for the overall well-being of women, Shape is not only about staying fit. Topics include healthy eating, celebrities, and fashion. They also feature contests and weight-loss challenges to get you motivated.

Subscribe to Arthritis Advisor

Aimed at those who suffer from or treat muscle and joint pain, the Arthritis Advisor is a respected magazine published by the Cleveland Clinic.

Subscribe to Heart Advisor

Heart disease is one of the major killers of adults throughout the world, and the Cleveland Clinic’s magazine, Heart Advisor, discusses the latest news in regards to treatments.